"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Get Smart with NPR's "Talk of the Nation" Live from the Aspen Ideas Festival

Jun 26, 2012
Originally published on October 16, 2012 8:03 pm

This week, Talk of the Nation host Neal Conan kicked off NPR's live coverage of the annual Aspen Ideas Festival and Aspen Environment Forum. From 12PM-2PM MT (2PM-4PM ET) Monday, June 25 through Thursday, June 28, the midday talk program is featuring live conversations with global thought leaders from the festival for the second year in a row. Busy being productive during that time? Not to worry! Audio is available every day at approximately 6 PM (ET) at NPR.org.

With a high concentration of environmental scientists currently in Aspen, Neal had the opportunity to connect listeners with the researchers who have seen evidence of climate change firsthand – loss in Arctic sea ice, an increase in extreme weather events (drought, floods, and heat waves, to name a few). Check out yesterday's conversation between Neal, biologist George Divoky, research ecologist Craig Allen, NPR Science correspondent Richard Harris, and various listeners exploring the possible effects of climate change here.

In addition to dialogues exploring the environment and conservation, Neal will chat with prominent thought leaders in social media, politics, and international affairs and connect them with listeners throughout the week. Browse some of Talk's upcoming coverage highlights, below, to find topics that appeal to you. Submit your questions by calling (800) 989-8255, emailing talk@npr.org or visiting NPR.org.

Tuesday, June 26*

Environment: Global Water Policy Project director/founder Sandra Postel and photographer Peter McBride explain why the seventh largest river in the U.S. is vital to the world's ecology.

Foreign affairs: Humorist Firoozeh Dumas, novelist Assaf Gavron and scholar/writer Reza Aslan discuss what literature teaches us about the Middle East.

Politics: Award-winning author Luis Alberto Urrea, author of "The Devil's Highway," discusses stories of immigration and the conversations sparked by the Supreme Court ruling on the Arizona immigration law.

Wednesday, June 27*

Politics: NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving recaps the week. Vin Weber, former Republican member of Congress and partner of the consulting firm Mercury/Clark & Weinstock, and Anna Greenberg, senior vice president of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner, discuss what it will take to win the 2012 presidential election.

Investigations: NPR Counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston weighs in on the story she broke about FBI investigations into Islamic extremists in the military.

Domestic policy: Kenneth Feinberg, managing partner of Feinberg Rozen, LLP, discuss his role in determining fair compensation for victims of tragedies like 9/11 and the Virginia Tech Massacre.

Natural Disasters: KRCC (southern Colorado) news director Andrea Chalfin discusses the 'epic' Colorado wildfires.

Thursday, June 28*

Foreign affairs: Robert Kagan, senior fellow in foreign policy at Brookings Institute, and Richard Pildes, professor of constitutional law at New York University School of Law, lead a discussion of America's role in the world and how democracy has become key to legitimacy for modern societies.

Domestic policy: Mark Penn, worldwide CEO of Burson-Marsteller, discusses the results of a poll on American values.

Society and innovation: Ben Waber, president and CEO of Sociometric Solutions, and NPR's Shankar Vedantam discuss how social networks in the workplace influence happiness.

Art and inspiration: Musician/DJ Moby discusses the inspiration behind the photographs in his book "Destroyed," and his passion for photographing architecture around Los Angeles.

*Schedules subject to change. Updated June 27, 2012.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.