Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Georgia On His Mind, Gingrich Faces Key Primary

Feb 21, 2012

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is facing his most important challenge yet — winning Georgia on Super Tuesday. Georgia is considered Gingrich's home because he represented parts of the state in Congress for 20 years, but he hasn't lived there for more than a decade.

Over the weekend, Gingrich held several rallies, including one in Peachtree City, south of Atlanta, where he stressed that this area has long supported him.

"It is great to be home," Gingrich told the crowd. "I believe that I carried Fayette County in every single election, including the two that I lost."

Gingrich admitted that running for the Republican nomination is a tough fight, but he said he is prepared.

"This has been a little bit like riding a roller coaster. In fact, I tell folks it's a little bit like the roller coaster at Disney that's in the dark," he said. "If you've ever ridden Space Mountain, you don't know what's coming next. You don't know where you were, and you're not sure where you're going."

Gingrich called the contest a "wide-open race" and said recent polls prove that former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is not the inevitable nominee. As for former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, he said it remains to be seen how Santorum does in the next few weeks.

"But the fact is I am the only candidate in this race who has stood nose to nose with presidents of both parties and not flinched," Gingrich said.

Georgia's Conservatives

Both Gingrich and Santorum are going after voters seeking an alternative to Romney. Sunday night, Santorum appeared at First Redeemer, a Baptist megachurch north of Atlanta in the heart of Gingrich's old congressional district. Even Santorum was surprised at the reception he got from thousands who crammed into the sanctuary.

Santorum didn't talk about his GOP challengers but instead criticized President Obama, saying the federal government is overreaching, oppressive and threatening religious freedom.

"This is why this election here in the state of Georgia is so important," Santorum said. "You've got the biggest delegate prize on Super Tuesday, the biggest day of this primary election. What are you going to do?"

Four years ago, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee spoke at this same church and ultimately won the Georgia primary. It's clear Santorum hopes to capture that same religious conservative block, and many voters here are behind the former senator.

"I was really impressed. I've liked Santorum from the beginning, but hearing him speak really inspired me more," said Georgia voter Lisa McBryant. She said she likes Gingrich but that she leans more toward Santorum's conservative values.

Gingrich's Challenge

Merle Black, a political science professor at Emory University in Atlanta, said to win here, Gingrich has to get the support of those who classify themselves as very conservative and somewhat conservative. And he has to regain the momentum he had in January and in South Carolina, whose primary he won Jan. 21.

"In order for Gingrich to really do well, he'd have to kind of bring back a lot of voters that have looked at him and looked away again," Black said. "That's very, very hard in politics. So he needs a big win in Georgia in order to set off the possibility of any kind of Southern strategy."

Gingrich also has to combat negative ads that started running here last week, well ahead of the March 6 primary, some paid for by the superPAC that backs Romney.

Still, Gingrich has his solid backers. At the rally in Peachtree City, Ellen Rodriguez said she has known Gingrich for more than three decades.

"Our sons and his daughters sat on the floor and stuffed envelopes for him, so we have voted for him every time he's ever run," Rodriguez said.

Gingrich is planning a bus trip around the state next week to attract new supporters and shore up votes from his former constituents. And while he acknowledges a loss in Georgia would be a problem, he says it wouldn't force him out of the race.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.