Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Gals Who Grill: What Will It Take For Women To Man The Q?

May 25, 2013
Originally published on May 28, 2013 11:36 am

There's a lot of innovation in grilling — everything from fancy briquettes to gadgets that help grill veggies to perfection.

But according to survey data from the NPD Group, one thing that's not changing is who's firing up the grill.

Men are more than twice as likely as women to be the primary griller in the household, according to the survey. Only 19 percent of households report that it's women who are taking charge of grill duties.

And statistically, that hasn't budged since the group started collecting data on this topic a few decades ago.

The grill "is the one and only male-dominated appliance in America," says Harry Balzer of NPD Group. One reason? Grilling can feel like a form of recreation.

"Grilling is awesome," my colleague Uri Berliner told me over a casual water-cooler chat. "All you have to do is stand there and drink beer while you watch the meat cook."

So are gender roles fixed in stone when it comes to grilling? Not necessarily. There's evidence that women are increasingly taking an interest.

Craig Goldwyn (aka Meathead) of the site AmazingRibs.com says 40 percent of the people who visit his site are women.

And Elizabeth Karmel of GirlsAtTheGrill.com sees a shift, too. She acknowledges that grilling is still male-dominated, but "I think it's changing," she told me by phone.

As a female grilling enthusiast, she says her goal is not to push men out of the way, "but rather for women to share in the fun."

So what leads women to the grill, especially if it's a job they had previously ceded to the men in the house?

Well, Karmel says, oftentimes for women it's the realization that they've already done a lot of the time-consuming work, including shopping for the meat and prepping it.

So actually putting it on the grill? "It's just the last step," Karmel says. And grilling it yourself can add the quality control to ensure it doesn't get burned or dried out (if the man in your house is prone to that sort of negligence).

"A lot of women have come up to me and told me that" kind of story, she says. And when they step into the role of grilling, "they love the positive reinforcement."

And meat is just the beginning. These days, there's grilled fruit and pizza, not to mention veggies.

Take asparagus: The grill, Karmel says, takes this veggie that your mom wanted you to eat and turns it into something that you can't stop eating.

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