Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pages

Gain Together, Lose Together: The Weight-Loss 'Halo' Effect

Mar 12, 2012
Originally published on March 12, 2012 5:19 pm

Here's another good reason to lose weight: It might benefit your friends, family and co-workers. Such altruism might be just the final "nudge" some of us need.

Researchers are finding that the friends and family of obese and overweight individuals who lose weight lost weight themselves, and sometimes a lot of it. Dr. John Morton, who directs Bariatric Surgery at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, calls obesity a "family disease."

"We all gather around the table to enjoy a meal together and we learn lessons when we do that," Morton says. "Just like you impart morals to your sons and daughters, you can do the same thing around the dinner table as well and it can be good or bad; we see that all the time."

In fact, studies have shown that friends and family tend to gain weight together, in large part because they share similar eating and exercise habits. But over the years, Morton picked up another trend among his patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery, and their families. The obese and overweight sons, daughters and spouses of his patients lost weight, too.

So Morton decided to do a formal study and track families of 35 patients who had gastric bypass. One year after the surgery, he found that indeed, other overweight and obese family members lost weight, between 8 and 45 pounds.

"This was noteworthy in that these patients were able to accomplish that just by coming to the same visits that the bariatric surgery patient did," he says.

The so-called "halo effect" has been shown among people who drink alcohol and people who smoke, as well as those who gain weight. But now, Morton showed a positive halo effect — losing weight.

"I think most of the family members who came wanted to help out their spouse, Dad, whoever it might be," he says. "They wanted to support them and they supported them by making healthy food choices, by exercising together."

Morton's study, which was published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery, found that family members lost as much as 5 percent of their initial body weight, enough weight loss to bring down the risk of obesity-related heart disease and diabetes.

Now, another study has turned up similar findings but not just with family. Tricia Leahey is a psychologist and researcher at The Miriam Hospital's Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Leahey investigated a team-based weight loss competition in Rhode Island. This is an annual state-sponsored competition that joins individuals to compete against one another to see which team loses the most weight.

Teams range from four to 11 people and can include family members, but also friends and co-workers. After 12 weeks, Leahey found that those that lost the most weight were on the same team, suggesting "significant social influence." In fact, the more people reported feeling peer influence to lose weight and exercise more, the more weight they lost.

Similar to the Stanford study, the average weight loss of the biggest losers hovered around 5 percent of their initial body weight.

"It may not sound like a lot in terms of weight loss, but 10 to 15 pounds is a lot in terms of health benefit," says Leahey. "A 5 percent weight loss reduces your risk for heart disease and diabetes significantly."

Leahey's study was published online in the journal Obesity.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People try many ways to keep down their weight, but sometimes the only option appears to be surgery to lose weight. And that may have surprising benefits for friends and family. NPR's Patti Neighmond reports.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: As a doctor, Gary Wisner knew all about the benefits of exercise and a healthy diet. As an orthopedic surgeon, he also knew that excess weight was harmful for the joints. Even so, as years went by, his weight went up and up. He weighed 288 pounds at 5-foot-7.

DR. GARY WISNER: I would go on a diet. I would lose weight. Then I'd put it back on. So my rebound was out of control as anything. No matter what I did, I would put my weight back on.

NEIGHMOND: His medications for diabetes and hypertension were beginning to fail. The last resort, says Wisner: surgery to reduce his stomach size and his appetite.

WISNER: My weight is 169 pounds. And I fluctuate, occasionally, to 173 - and I go back down to 169. So for the last five years, I have been between 169 and 173 pounds.

NEIGHMOND: A total weight loss of over 110 pounds. And in an interesting twist, it wasn't just Wisner who benefitted from the surgery. His family did, too.

WISNER: My daughter would be considered obese, and she dropped weight dramatically. My wife would just be, I would say, overweight, and she went back down to her ideal body weight.

NEIGHMOND: Now, it turns out this is somewhat typical. Dr. John Morton performed Wisner's surgery.

DR. JOHN MORTON: I really do think that obesity is a family disease.

NEIGHMOND: Morton directs bariatric surgery at Stanford University.

MORTON: We all gather around the table to enjoy a meal together, and we learn lessons when we do that. Just like you impart morals to your sons and your daughters, you can do the same thing around the dinner table as well. And it can be either good or bad, you know. We see that all the time.

NEIGHMOND: Studies show that friends and family gain weight together. But over the years, Morton also noticed the opposite. Like Gary Wisner's family, the overweight sons, daughters and spouses of his bariatric patients lost weight, too.

So Morton decided to do a formal study, and track families of 35 patients who had gastric bypass. One year after the surgery, other obese family members did indeed lose weight, between eight and 45 pounds.

MORTON: This was noteworthy in that these patients were able to accomplish that just by coming to the same visits that the bariatric surgery patient did.

NEIGHMOND: The so-called halo effect.

MORTON: I think most of the family members who came wanted to help out their spouse or their dad, or whoever it might be. And they wanted to support them, and they supported them by making healthy food choices, exercising together.

NEIGHMOND: Family members lost about 4 to 5 percent of their initial body weight, enough weight loss to bring down the risk of obesity-related heart disease and diabetes.

Now, another study across the country turned up similar findings, but not just with family. Tricia Leahey is a psychologist at Brown University.

TRICIA LEAHEY: Shape Up Rhode Island is an annual competition that occurs in the state of Rhode Island, and individuals join with co-workers, friends, family members...

NEIGHMOND: ...who make up teams - about four to 10 people. They compete to see which team loses the most weight over three months. Leahey found the biggest losers were on the same teams - suggesting significant social influence, even on the job.

LEAHEY: Your co-worker a couple of doors down says, you want to go out to lunch? And you might choose to go to a salad shop versus a pizza joint, to keep your calories low and achieve your weight-loss goals with each other. Whereas if you didn't necessarily have that person there, you don't necessarily have that accountability that that...

NEIGHMOND: Leahey says more states, and work sites, are setting up weight-loss competitions similar to the one in Rhode Island, and that could offer a hopeful sign in battling the nation's obesity epidemic – socially contagious weight loss.

Patti Neighmond, NPR News.

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INSKEEP: And that's "Your Health" for this Monday morning. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.