"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Fueled By Outside Money, Ad Blitz Hasn't Stopped For Weary Iowans

May 29, 2012
Originally published on May 29, 2012 8:45 pm

One of the big story lines in this year's presidential election is the unprecedented role of outside money. Millions are being raised and spent by groups that back one candidate or another.

Those groups are buying advertisements, often to launch attacks on the candidates they don't like. It's an area where pro-Republican ads have overwhelmingly outnumbered those backing Democrats.

One place these ads are hard to miss is in Iowa.

It's not even summer yet, and the dust from the primaries has barely settled. But in battleground states, things seem especially intense already this election season.

Just ask 27-year-old Anders Dovre from Slater, Iowa. "The campaign? Did it ever stop?"

Typically in Iowa, you get the caucuses in January, and then it's usually pretty quiet until Labor Day or so. But last month alone, in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids, there were more than 250 TV ads promoting President Obama, and nearly the same amount for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, according to numbers compiled by the Wesleyan Media Project.

"Normally, we kind of get some time off," says voter Bryan Dolezal, who runs a business in Cedar Rapids. "Lately it's been constant. [As] soon as one election's done, you start hearing about the next one already."

The big change this year is the rise of the outside advocacy groups, which are paying for most of the ads — often with contributions from wealthy, anonymous donors.

In the Iowa TV spots last month, just over half of the pro-Obama ads were official campaign spots, while none of the Romney ads were. All of them came from an outside group.

Such ads sound and look like any other campaign spot — and that's the point.

An ad attacking the president from Crossroads GPS, a group co-founded by Republican strategist Karl Rove, says: "President Obama's agenda promised so much," before ticking off promises it says he's broken.

Meanwhile, a pro-Obama ad from the superPAC Priorities USA Action, hits Romney, saying: "Romney's proposing a huge new $150,000 tax cut for the wealthiest 1 percent, while cutting Medicare and education for us."

The only way to tell who paid for any given ad is to pay close attention all the way to the very end. It's easy for the average voter to be confused, says Dennis Goldford, a professor at Drake University.

"Even if you want to wait till the end of the ad and view who they're sponsored by, just visually, even with a high-def television, it's sometimes very hard to read that fine print, and you've got to remember to do it," Goldford says.

In two days interviewing voters in Iowa, no one said this big increase in outside money, much of it from anonymous donors, is a good thing. Still, some, like John Olson, 42, from Ankeny, say they have been able to tune it out so far.

"I haven't seen a whole lot of it," he says. "I actually, strangely enough, have been watching less TV. So I have not seen a whole lot of those ads yet."

But Olson is troubled by what the influx of cash means. So too is Dovre, the 27-year-old from Slater, who is a high school teacher.

"I teach them and tell them they have a voice in this process, and more and more I feel like I'm telling them a lie," he says. "I tell them every day you need to have an opinion — an informed opinion — and you need to act on it. And more and more, it seems like I'm telling them that for nothing."

In the city of Urbandale, Dean Kleckner, a conservative Republican and retired farmer, also says the current system doesn't work. His solution? No limits on spending or contributions, but he says they should go directly to political parties or to candidates, and there should be full disclosure.

"So let's not limit the amount, but let's say they have to report it immediately or within a reasonable amount of time, and let people make up their own minds about whether that person is being influenced by the money or not," Kleckner says.

Now, voters have for many, many years complained about the role of money in U.S. elections. So that's nothing new.

But even if the economy remains the big issue this year, outside cash is something many voters are increasingly aware of — and they are talking about it.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More now on the unprecedented role that outside money is playing in this election year. Supposedly independent groups are raising and spending millions of dollars on behalf of candidates across the country. The groups buy ads, the majority of which are negative, and pro-Republican ads have overwhelmingly outnumbered those backing Democrats.

NPR's Don Gonyea traveled to Iowa to see what voters think about the advertising and about the power of outside money.

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: It's not even summer yet, the dust from the primaries has barely settled, but in battleground states, things seem especially intense already this election season. Just ask 27-year-old Anders Dovery from Slater, Iowa.

ANDERS DOVERY: The campaign, and did it ever stop?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

GONYEA: In Iowa, you get the caucuses in January, then it's usually pretty quiet until Labor Day or so. But last month alone, in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids, there were more than 250 TV ads promoting President Obama and nearly the same amount for Mitt Romney according to numbers compiled by the Wesleyan Media Project. Voter Brian Dolezal runs a business in Cedar Rapids.

BRIAN DOLEZAL: Normally we kind of get some time off. And lately, it's been constant from - soon as one election's done, you start hearing about the next one already.

GONYEA: The big change this year is the rise of outside advocacy groups. Such groups are paying for most of the ads, often with contributions from wealthy, anonymous donors. Those Iowa TV spots from last month, just over half of the pro-Obama ads were official campaign spots. While none of the Romney ads were. All of them came from an outside group. Such ads sound and look like any other campaign spot, and that's the point. Here's the one attacking the president.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: President Obama's agenda promised so much.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: We must help the millions of homeowners who are facing foreclosure.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Promise broken.

GONYEA: And there's this one attacking Romney.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN AD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Now Romney's proposing a huge new $150,000 tax cut for the wealthiest one percent while cutting Medicare and education for us.

GONYEA: That pro-Obama ad is from Priorities USA Action. The pro-Romney ad is from Crossroads GPS, a group cofounded by Republican strategist Karl Rove. The only way to tell who paid for any given ad is to pay close attention all the way to the very end.

It's easy for the average voter to be confused, says Professor Dennis Goldford of Drake University.

DENNIS GOLDFORD: Even if you want to wait till the end of the ad and view who they're sponsored by, just visually, even with a high-def television, it's sometimes very hard to read that fine print. And you've got to remember to do it.

GONYEA: In two days interviewing voters in Iowa, no one said this big increase in outside money, much of it from anonymous donors, is a good thing. Still, some, like 42-year-old John Olson from Ankeny, say they're able to tune it out so far.

JOHN OLSON: I haven't seen a whole lot of it. I actually, strangely enough, have been watching less TV. So I have not seen a whole lot of those ads yet.

GONYEA: But Olson is troubled by what the influx of cash means. So, too, is Anders Dovery. You heard his voice at the beginning of this story. Dovery is a teacher.

DOVERY: I teach high school students. And I teach them and tell them they have a voice in this process. And more and more, I feel like I'm telling them a lie. I tell them every day, you need to have an opinion, an informed opinion. You need to act on it. And more and more, it seems like I'm telling them that for nothing.

GONYEA: In the city of Urbandale, Dean Kleckner a conservative Republican and retired farmer also says the current system doesn't work. His solution: No limits on spending or contributions. But he says they should go directly to political parties or to candidates, and there should be full disclosure.

DEAN KLECKNER: So let's not limit the amount. But let's say they have to report it immediately or within a reasonable amount of time, and let them people make up their own minds about whether that person is being influenced by the money or not.

GONYEA: Now, voters have, for many, many years, complained about the role of money in U.S. elections, so that's nothing new. But even if the economy remains the big issue this year, outside cash is something voters are increasingly aware of and they are talking about it. Don Gonyea NPR News Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.