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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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French Family Set Free After Cameroon Kidnapping

Apr 19, 2013
Originally published on April 19, 2013 1:42 pm

Members of a French family held for weeks by Boko Haram militants in Cameroon have been freed and are in good health, Al-Jazeera reports, citing Cameroonian and French officials.

Cameroon's President Paul Biya, in a statement read on national radio, said the couple and their four children, aged 5 to 12, had been "handed over last night to Cameroonian authorities."

The family was seized on Feb. 19 by armed men on motorcycles while visiting Waza National Park in Cameroon, near the border with Nigeria. The father, Tanguy Moulin-Fournier, is an employee of the French gas group GDF Suez. He had been working in the Cameroonian capital, Yaounde.

"I spoke to the father this morning," French President Francois Hollande said Friday, speaking in Paris. "He told me how happy and relieved he was."

Hollande said there had been discreet talks in recent weeks aimed at securing the family's release, but he was quick to quash speculation that any money exchanged hands: "France has not changed its position, which is not to pay ransoms."

The French government said the six would be returned to France on Saturday.

But, as French troops fight Islamic separatists in Mali, there are still eight other French citizens being held in the region.

The release of the Moulin-Fournier family "will redouble our determination to free the hostages who remain," Hollande said.

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