Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

32 minutes ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Pages

Ford Unit Apologizes For Demeaning Ads

Mar 26, 2013
Originally published on March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And out next business story fits in the category of what were they thinking? Ford Motor Company is apologizing for ads sketched up by an agency in India - ads that have been decried as demeaning to women. They are cartoon drawings showing off how spacious a Ford trunk can be. One spoofs Italy's former prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi. He's at the wheel, and in the trunk, three women, tied up.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: The ads were never used commercially. They were created by an ad agency hired in India by Ford, JWT India. The idea is that the trunk of Ford's Figo -a subcompact car - is so roomy, as the ad show, Paris Hilton could fit the Kardashian sisters bound and gagged in the trunk. Or a Formula-one driver, Michael Schumacher, could fit his male rivals - again, bound and gagged - in the trunk.

Ford spokesman Chris Preuss says the ads were part of a creative exercise that was never and would never have been approved by the company.

CHRIS PREUSS: It would impossible to speculate what would leave individuals with the idea that this would be seen as any kind of a creative exercise that would be considered noteworthy or remarkable other than Ford's indecency and being so contrary to the standards that we all hold to.

GLINTON: The ads have caused a stir, especially given India's recent turmoil over violence against woman. They also come at a particularly bad time for Ford, as the Indian car market becomes increasingly important and India grows its own car business.

Again, Ford's Chris Preuss.

PREUSS: It's brought a lot of embarrassment to the company and we'd just like to move on and make sure it never happens again.

GLINTON: In a statement the ad agency, JWT India, apologized as well, saying, quote, "Actions have been taken within the agency to deal with the situation."

Sonari Glinton, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.