NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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A Fine Night For Romney, But No Game Change

Aug 31, 2012

It's been the political world's obsession for weeks leading into the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

Would nominee Mitt Romney manage what would be miraculous for any candidate, and in a handful of days and one big speech wash away the problems of a modern candidacy?

Turns out Romney's moment Thursday night was a fine one, if not a great one.

His speech continued the campaign's concerted effort to reach out to skeptical female voters, reminding the audience that his strong mother ran for Senate.

It spoke to those disillusioned with President Obama, and criticized his record on the economy and lack of business experience, while stressing his own.

And it had its genuinely moving interludes — the must-have humanizing moments the often stiff and always private candidate was advised to serve up to the likeability gods.

Romney, who appeared a bit exhausted from the start, teared up when talking about his mother, and again when he expressed the heart-tugging longing he and his wife, Ann, experience for the days when their house was filled with their five sons and all their noise and rambunctiousness.

But the speech, and its already familiar themes, seemed unlikely to light a fire under the small slice of America's electorate still deciding whom to vote for, or whether to even head to the polls.

The night, however — with the exception of the awfully strange, quixotic appearance by Clint Eastwood speaking to an invisible Obama, who he pretended was sitting on a real chair onstage — was chock-a-block with powerful testimonials for the newly minted nominee.

Mormon church members recalled his kindnesses when he led a congregation in Boston. Business partners talked about a successful, hands-on penny pincher. A Massachusetts official who worked for him while he was governor described him as "authentic."

And there was a truly charming biographical video, stressing family and hard work, with home movies featuring Romney's father, a Michigan governor and auto company executive, and captivating images of young Ann and Mitt Romney and their brood.

The problem?

That personal, strong program was interrupted by the Eastwood "interlude" (that's how a clearly startled Romney campaign began describing the actor's unscripted performance), and a speech by rising GOP star Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who started strong but flagged.

A quote by the late Herb Brooks, who coached the U.S. Olympic hockey team to gold in 1980, which included a win over a powerful Soviet team, ended the Romney video: "Great moments are born from great opportunity," it read.

Romney had an effective night, if it didn't end up being a great night.

That was enough for supporters like Janice Adkison, 52, of Florida, who said she has had to warm to Romney.

"My husband and I both had reservations," she said, citing concerns about Romney's lack of magnetism. "But the more we learned about his personal life, his family, his business, the more impressed we were," she said as she left the hall after the balloons and confetti had dropped. "We don't need a celebrity; we need a leader."

Enough for Adkison and supporters like her, and maybe more Americans — if they didn't switch channels when Eastwood was talking to his imaginary president.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.