NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Pages

To Find Truly Wild Rice, Head North To Minnesota

Sep 16, 2012
Originally published on September 18, 2012 2:43 pm

Harvest season is upon us, but in the U.S.'s northern lakes, it's not just the last tomatoes and first pumpkins. Through the end of this month, canoes will glide into lakes and rivers for the annual gathering of wild rice, kick started with the popular Wild Rice Festival in Roseville, Minn., on Saturday.

Wild rice - an aquatic grass that bears a resemblance to the edible grain - has been the center of the Ojibway Indian diet and culture for centuries. It's considered a gift from the Creator, according to Thomas Vennum, who wrote the book on it. According to legend, the Ojibway followed a prophecy to find the place where the food grows on the water, which was around Lake Superior, particularly in Minnesota.

The Ojibway gather wild rice by hand. Ricers went out two to a canoe, one with a forked push pole, and the other with a pair of wooden flails used to knock the rice into the boat. To protect the fields, Minnesota restricts the harvesting season and regulates boats and tools. Tribal harvesters manage themselves, and reservation waters are off limits to other ricers.

I grew up in 1950s Minnesota eating this nutty, earthy grain, and I didn't realize that in other places, it was a rare treat. But in the 1960s, scientists and businessmen tamed the wild rice, grew it in paddies and harvested by machine. Thirty years later, less than 10 percent of the world's wild rice was gathered by hand. Unlike the irregular, light brown lake rice, cultivated rice is almost black and uniform in size and shape.

But "cultivated" is a swear word on the reservation. Wild rice is a source of income for the Ojibway, and the cheaper paddy rice dropped the price. There are also other concerns like mining, dams, and inclement weather. This year, severe flooding drowned much of the crop.

Processing — or finishing — lake rice is hugely labor intensive. First, it's parched, or roasted, over a fire. Then it's hulled and winnowed. This can involve dancing the rice in a pit. But there have been a few mechanical advancements.

Bruce Savage has been finishing rice since he was 16. He's now 50 and is called "the young guy" because rice finishing is a dying art. He finished 15,000 pounds last year at his home on the edge of the reservation. Rule of thumb? 100 pounds per person.

His friend Rick Smith, who works with American Indian youth at the University of Minnesota, explains, "Rice is very spiritual for us. That's why we came here."

Bonny Wolf is the contributing editor of NPR's Kitchen Window. You can follow her on Twitter at @bonnywolf.




Recipe: Wild Rice Krispy Bars

This recipe is from Rick Smith, director of the American Indian Learning Resource Center at the University of Minnesota's Duluth campus. He says only hand-parched wild lake rice works. Cultivated wild rice doesn't pop. Don't expect fluffy kernels like popcorn. Wild lake rice pops into tiny, squiggly forms. It has a rich, nutty taste and wonderful crunch. The cooking medium is vegetable oil or, if you're really feeling decadent, lard. Wild rice pops very quickly – in under 5 seconds – so be careful. Serve it plain with salt as an hors d'ouevres, sprinkle in salads or make into, yes, wild rice krispy treats.

¼ pound (1 stick) butter

10 ounces marshmallows

8-10 cups popped wild rice

Vegetable oil

To pop the rice, fill an 8-inch skillet 2/3 full with shortening. Heat until almost boiling, but not smoking. It's ready when you drop a kernel of rice into the hot oil and it pops.

Put ¼ cup or less wild rice into the bottom of a 6-inch wire mesh strainer and immerse into hot oil for 2 to 5 seconds, or until all rice is popped. (There is also an instructional rice-popping YouTube video.) Drain in paper towel-lined container. Continue until you have desired amount of rice.

Melt butter in a 10-inch cooking pot over low heat. Add marshmallows and stir until completely melted. Add popped wild rice and stir into marshmallow mix until well coated.

Butter a 12-by-16-by-1-inch pan. Using a buttered spatula or waxed paper, press mixture evenly into the pan. Cut into squares when cool.



Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.