Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Fighting Fit, Venezuela's Chavez Roars Back

Feb 9, 2012
Originally published on February 9, 2012 6:15 pm

Last year was a tough one for Venezuela's firebrand leftist president, Hugo Chavez, who has frequently taunted the United States during his 13 years in power.

In June, a cancerous tumor was discovered in Chavez's abdomen, forcing him to dramatically scale back public appearances as he sought treatment in Cuba. Some predicted that the end was near.

But this year, Chavez has returned to his outspoken ways — just in time for his re-election campaign.

A few days ago, he served as the president, commander in chief and emcee at a long military parade. He looked robust once more, his black hair back to normal from the chemotherapy.

At least from afar, Chavez appeared to be in fine form once again, as he sang to supporters lined up for the parade.

He then explained how the song is about his idol, independence hero Simon Bolivar, and how Bolivar rode his horse home to rebuild his country — Chavez's implication being that now the same can be said about him.

Outside his inner circle, of course, no one really knows for sure just how healthy he is. He has said only that doctors removed a baseball-size tumor, and that after four chemotherapy sessions, he is better than ever.

What is clear is that suddenly this year, Chavez seems to be everywhere, says Carlos Romero, a political scientist in Caracas. "He has been spending many hours in the Congress, in the national assembly; he has been spending many hours in front of journalists in the presidential palace; he has been traveling abroad; he has been traveling inside the country; he has been in some rallies in Venezuela," he says.

Romero says the strategy has had an impact. "People thought in June that Chavez will be out. We already have seen seven months and Chavez is not only recuperating his health but also is recuperating his leadership," Romero says.

Indeed, supporters like 62-year-old Hilda Rivera have been watching him on television. She says he is back for sure. "My president is fine," she says, explaining that she prayed and prayed for him to recover.

That kind of loyalty — which has helped Chavez stay in power since 1999 — has given him a spike in various polls ahead of October's presidential election.

Last week, at a festive event marking the 20th anniversary of his first attempt to gain power — a failed coup — Chavez characterized himself as a humble servant.

Chavez said that a revolution can't depend on one man — it's far too big for that.

And he revved up his followers, just days ahead of the opposition's first-ever primary to choose a candidate to run against Chavez — telling them that the old political guard would never return, no matter what kind of campaign is mounted against him.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to Venezuela where firebrand leftist president Hugo Chavez had a tough year last year. In June, doctors found a cancerous tumor in his abdomen. Chavez sought treatment in Cuba and dramatically scaled back his public appearances. Some predicted the end was near.

But, this year, Chavez has regained his bluster just in time for his reelection campaign. NPR's Juan Forero reports from Caracas, Venezuela.

JUAN FORERO, BYLINE: Just days ago, there he was, president, commander-in-chief and emcee at a long military parade. He looked robust once more, his black hair back to normal from the chemotherapy. At least from afar, President Hugo Chavez appeared to, once again, be in fine form as he sang to supporters lined for the parade.

PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ: (Singing in Foreign Language).

FORERO: He then explained how the song's about his idol, independent hero, Simon Bolivar, and how he rode his horse home to rebuild his country.

CHAVEZ: (Foreign Language Spoken).

FORERO: Chavez's implication being that now the same can be said about him. Outside his inner circle, of course, no one really knows for sure just how healthy he is. He's only said that doctors removed a baseball-sized tumor and that, after four chemotherapy sessions, he's better than ever.

What is clear is that, suddenly this year, Chavez seems to be everywhere, says Carlos Romero, a political scientist here.

CARLOS ROMERO: He has been spending many hours in the Congress, in the National Assembly. He is spending many hours in front of journalists in the presidential palace. He has been traveling abroad. He has been traveling inside the country. He has been in some rallies in Venezuela.

FORERO: Romero says the strategy has had an impact.

ROMERO: People thought that Chavez will be out. We already have six, seven months and Chavez is not only recuperating his health, but also he's recuperating his leadership.

FORERO: Indeed, supporters like 62 year old Hilda Rivera have been watching him on television and she says he's back for sure.

HILDA RIVERA: (Through Translator) My president is fine, she says, explaining that she prayed and prayed for him to recover. That kind of loyalty, which has helped Chavez stay in power since 1999, has given him a spike in various polls, ahead of October's presidential election.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

FORERO: At one festive event to mark the 20th anniversary of his first attempt to gain power, a failed coup, Chavez characterized himself as a humble servant.

CHAVEZ: (Foreign Language Spoken).

FORERO: A revolution can't depend on just one man, Chavez says. A revolution is far too big for that. And he revved up his followers just days ahead of the opposition's first ever primary to choose a candidate to run against Chavez.

CHAVEZ: (Foreign Language Spoken).

FORERO: Telling them that the old political guard would never return no matter what kind of campaign is mounted against him. Juan Forero, NPR News, Caracas. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.