"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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FCC To Vote On Putting TV's Campaign Ad Data Online

Apr 27, 2012
Originally published on April 27, 2012 7:24 am

Government regulators take up a rule with wide political implications Friday. The Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote on a proposal requiring TV stations to post online information about the campaign ads they air.

Stations are already compelled to keep those records in public files. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski says it's time to make that information available on the Internet. But TV stations are resisting.

Genachowski says he wants to bring broadcasters into the 21st century with his proposal to put information about ad buys and spending online. Open-government groups applaud the idea.

Lisa Rosenberg with the Sunlight Foundation says the Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case opened up the floodgates for political ad spending — the source of which in many cases is hidden. The FCC rule wouldn't change that, but it would make the process more open.

"What this FCC rule-making would do would bring to light a little of the information behind those ads," she says. "We think it's a very important first step to disclosing and uncovering the dark money that's paying for our elections."

While that information is available at the TV stations airing the ads, if it's not online, she says, it's not public.

Kent State University journalism professor Karl Idsvoog recently assigned his students to go to Cleveland-area TV stations. He says none of the station officials would agree to a taped interview, and the students were charged 50 cents a page to make copies of the public records.

He says the students were left with an important lesson: "Why would TV stations, when they make a bundle of money going out doing reporting day after day — oftentimes going after public records — why would that business not want to make their public records available online?"

The answer, Idsvoog says, is business. The stations, which collectively stand to earn an estimated $3 billion running campaign ads in this presidential election year, have argued that complying with the new rule would cost them money and force them to reveal their ad rates to competitors.

Former Sen. Gordon Smith, president of the National Association of Broadcasters, did not respond to interview requests. But FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell argues stations are in a tough spot.

"Politicians are actually entitled by law to the cheapest rate that a TV broadcaster offers, and in order to be able to verify that they're getting the cheapest rate, they wanted to be able to see it. So that resulted in the requirement that that lowest unit rate be put in the file," McDowell says. "So that also has competitive concerns for them, though, when you post it online."

McDowell has proposed removing the rate information from the data that stations would be made to post online. He says TV stations are unfairly being singled out.

"Not newspapers, not radio stations, not cable TV stations, not political consultants who pay people to knock on doors and things like that — but just TV broadcasters," he says. "So let's look at the entities spending the money rather than just one of a broad universe of folks who are receiving it."

McDowell concedes that he's likely to be outvoted Friday by the two other commissioners. But the new rule still represents a compromise: Only stations in the 50 biggest markets will have to comply this year. That means smaller cities in many of the swing states likely to be hotly contested in this fall's presidential and Senate races will be exempt from the new requirement.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, government regulators are taking up a rule with wide political implications today. The Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote on a proposal requiring TV stations to post information about campaign ads. They would have to use the Internet to put up information they must already keep in public files. NPR's Brian Naylor explains why TV stations are resisting.

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: FCC chairman Julius Genachowski says he wants to bring broadcasters into the 21st century with his proposal to put information about ad buys and spending online. Open government groups applaud the idea.

Lisa Rosenberg with the Sunlight Foundation says the Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case opened up the floodgates for political ad spending, the source of which in many cases is hidden. The FCC rule wouldn't change that, but would make the process more open.

LISA ROSENBERG: What this FCC rule-making would do would bring to light a little of the information behind those ads. And we think it's a very important first step to disclosing and uncovering the dark money that's paying for our elections.

NAYLOR: And while that information is available at the TV stations airing the ads, if it's not online, she says, it's not really public.

Kent State University journalism Professor Karl Idsvoog recently assigned his students to go to Cleveland area TV stations to view the public records. He says none of the station officials would agree to a taped interview and the students were charged 50 cents a page to make copies of the records. He says the students were left with an important lesson.

KARL IDSVOOG: Why would TV stations, when they make a bundle of money going out, doing reporting day after day, oftentimes going after public records, why would that business not want to make their public records available online?

NAYLOR: The answer, Idsvoog says, is business. The stations, which collectively stand to earn an estimated $3 billion running campaign ads in this presidential election year, have argued complying with the new rule would cost them money and force them to reveal their ad rates to competitors.

The National Association of Broadcasters president, former Senator Gordon Smith, did not respond to interview requests. But FCC commissioner Robert McDowell argues stations are in a tough spot.

ROBERT MCDOWELL: Politicians are actually entitled by law to the cheapest rate that a TV broadcaster offers. And in order to be able to verify that they're getting the cheapest rate, they wanted to be able to see it. And so that resulted in the requirement that that lowest unit rate be put in the file. So that also has competitive concerns for them, though, when you post it online.

NAYLOR: McDowell has proposed removing the rate information from the data stations would be made to post online. He says TV stations are unfairly being singled out.

MCDOWELL: Not newspapers, not radio stations, not cable TV stations, not political consultants who pay people to knock on doors and things like that, but just TV broadcasters. So let's look at the entities spending the money rather than just one of a broad universe of folks who are receiving it.

NAYLOR: McDowell concedes, though, he's likely to be outvoted today by the two other commissioners. But the new rule still represents a compromise. Only stations in the 50 biggest markets will have to comply this year.

That means smaller cities in many of the swing states likely to be hotly contested in this fall's presidential and Senate races will be exempt from the new requirement.

Brian Naylor, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.