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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Fashion Matters In Tough Times, Says Top Designer

Nov 10, 2011

If you pay attention to the Emmys and Academy Awards, then you've probably seen those glamorous, haute couture gowns made by Kevan Hall. He's known for dressing A-listers like Vanessa Williams, Salma Hayek, Celine Dion — even first lady Michelle Obama.

His work has earned him multiple awards. After studying fashion design at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, he won a scholarship sponsored by the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising. After graduating, he won the Peacock Award for Outstanding Fashion Design. In 1989, the NAACP named him the Great American Designer, and in 2005, Life & Style Magazine named him Stylemaker of the Year.

Among the handful of top African-American designers in the country, Hall centers his work in Los Angeles. He'll be showing off his 2012 bridal and ready-to-wear collections Friday at the Washington Club in the nation's capital.

In an interview with Tell Me More host Michel Martin, Hall says he was about 7 years old when he first developed an interest in fashion, and that when he was watching television or films, he often had pen and paper in hand, sketching and pretending to redesign costumes for the people he saw on the screen. He also says his parents supported and encouraged his fashion interest.

Fast-forward to 1982, and the designer launched Kevan Hall Couture in Los Angeles. More than a decade later, he worked to revive the legendary house of Halston in New York, as its design and creative director. But people were skeptical that he could fulfill the prestigious position, mostly because he was not a New York insider.

But after showing his first collection, he won the esteem of those New Yorkers.

"It was a thrilling time for me. ... I commuted between New York and Los Angeles. And we were picked up by top retailers — Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue — and worn by a coterie of celebrities around the world," he says.

Michelle Obama also wore a simple polka-dot dress of Hall's during one of her speeches in Washington, says the designer. He says he knew she had chosen and owned the dress, but he didn't know when she'd wear it. He discovered the news on the Internet.

And for others around the nation, many who are struggling financially, Hall says he tries to find fabrics and other materials that are less expensive but still retain the luxurious look.

Hall says fashion still matters in these tough economic times because it's a huge industry nationwide, and particularly in California and New York.

"You have to think about the mills that are making fabrics. You think about ... the people that are sitting down, stitching the clothing. There's still a lot of industry and a lot of manufacturing that's done here, and it's an important part of our economy," he says.

As for aspiring fashion designers, Hall advises: "You must study at a school or study as an apprentice so that you really get your hands into the design process. You should immerse yourself in books and magazines and museums, and go to the stores and shop and look at all kinds of clothing. And pick something that really speaks to you, and follow that dream."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.