"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

Jun 15, 2012
Originally published on March 27, 2014 9:33 am

The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art and a great leap forward for human culture.

But now a novel method of determining the age of some of those cave paintings questions their provenance. Not that they're fakes — only that it might not have been modern humans who made them.

The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. Most depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held up to a wall.

But now scientists are suggesting those aren't human hands, at least in some caves in Spain.

Alistair Pike, an archaeologist at the University of Bristol in England who used a novel technique to get new dates for some of those paintings, says they're older than people thought, and they may just predate the arrival of humans in Europe.

"What we are saying is that we must entertain the possibility that these paintings were made by Neanderthals," Pike says. Those were humans' closest relatives, but they are not our species.

Pike says some of these paintings in Spain are at least 40,800 years old. At that time, Neanderthals had been running around Europe for 200,000 or 300,000 years. Modern humans had just arrived from Africa.

Pike concedes that maybe modern humans arrived in Europe with palette and pigment in hand, ready to paint up the town.

But the paintings could be even older. Pike's technique dates the age of the calcium carbonate that naturally forms in layers on top of the paintings. It's kind of like nature's shellac. Obviously the paintings had to be made before the first layer formed.

Archaeologist Joao Zilhao from the University of Barcelona is part of the team that did the work. He says his gut tells him it's Neanderthal art.

"We can't be 100 percent certain that they did it," Zilhao says. "I think that there is a strong probability. My point is the evidence for symbolic behavior among the Neanderthals already exists."

Neanderthals did perform ritual burials. They made decorative beads and other ornaments. Pike also notes that DNA evidence now suggests that modern humans and Neanderthals interbred.

"Why should it be surprising that Neanderthals produced art?" Pike says.

It does surprise archaeologists like Pat Shipman, who has spent a lifetime studying symbolic behavior. She wonders why Neanderthals waited until about the time humans arrived to get the itch to paint.

"OK, Neanderthals had been there for 300,000 years, and they're not doing this," Shipman says. "If they are not doing it before, why would they suddenly start doing it at that point?"

Shipman notes long before humans made the trek from Africa to Europe, they had been making all sorts of symbolic artifacts — ocher hash marks on stone or symmetrical marks on ostrich eggs.

"I find it easiest to assume that people who are already doing that moved into more figurative representations than thinking that an entirely other species of people suddenly came up with making figurative art," Shipman says.

The research appears in the journal Science. Pike says he needs to find paintings a few thousand years older than he has so far to make his case for Neanderthal art. He and his Spanish colleagues are headed back to find it.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On this Friday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art, and a great leap forward for human culture. Now, a different method of determining the age of some of these cave paintings is raising questions about their provenance.

It's not that they're fakes - just that it might not have been modern humans who made them. NPR's Christopher Joyce has this story.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE, BYLINE: The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. They depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held up to a wall.

But now, scientists are suggesting those aren't human hands - at least, in some caves in Spain. Alistair Pike is an archaeologist at the University of Bristol in England, who used a novel technique to get new dates for some of those paintings. He says they're older than people thought, and may just predate the arrival of humans in Europe.

ALISTAIR PIKE: What we are saying is that we must entertain the possibility that these paintings were made by Neanderthals.

JOYCE: Our closest relatives ever, but not our species. Pike says some of these paintings are at least 40,800 years old. At that time, Neanderthals pretty much owned Europe. Modern humans had just arrived from Africa. Pike concedes that maybe humans got there with palette and pigment in hand, ready to paint the town. But the paintings could be even older than that.

Pike's technique dates the age of the calcium carbonate that naturally forms in layers on top of the paintings. It's kind of like nature's shellac. Obviously, the paintings had to be made before the first layer formed. Archaeologist Joao Zilhao, from the University of Barcelona, is part of the scientific team. He says his gut tells him it's Neanderthal art.

JOAO ZILHAO: We can't be 100 percent certain that they did it. I think there is a strong probability. My point is, the evidence for symbolic behavior among the Neanderthals already exists.

JOYCE: Neanderthals did perform ritual burials. Pike notes that they also made ornaments, like decorative beads.

PIKE: Why should it be surprising that Neanderthals produced art?

JOYCE: Well, it does surprise archaeologists like Pat Shipman, who's spent a lifetime studying symbolic behavior. She wonders why Neanderthals waited till about the time humans arrived, to get the itch to paint.

PAT SHIPMAN: OK, Neanderthals had been there for 300,000 years - and they're not doing this. If they are not doing it before, why would they suddenly start doing it at that point?

JOYCE: Shipman notes long before humans made the trek from Africa to Europe, they had been making all sorts of symbolic artifacts - ocher hash marks on stone, or symmetrical marks on ostrich eggs; that sort of thing.

SHIPMAN: I find it easiest to assume that people who are already doing that moved into more figurative representations, than thinking that an entirely other species of people suddenly came up with making figurative art.

JOYCE: The research appears in the journal "Science." Pike says he needs to find paintings a few thousand years older than he has so far, to convince the skeptics.

Christopher Joyce, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.