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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Exercise Info, Not Calorie Counts, Helps Teens Drop Sodas

Dec 16, 2011
Originally published on December 16, 2011 1:13 pm

Sugary drinks like soda are a big cause of obesity, but public health types haven't had much luck convincing the public of that.

But what if you knew that it would take 50 minutes of jogging to burn off one soda?

When researchers taped signs saying just that on the drink coolers in four inner-city neighborhood stores, sales of sugary beverages to teenagers dropped by 50 percent. That tactic was more effective than a sign saying that the drinks had 250 calories each, or a sign saying that a soft drink accounts for 11 percent of recommended daily calories.

"I was skeptical," says Sara Bleich, an assistant professor of health policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who led the study. She wasn't sure if the low-cost intervention would work, or if it would work with the low-income African-American teenagers that was the target audience. But it did.

To test the idea, Bleich and her colleagues picked four corner stores near middle and high schools in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore. Each sign, which was a simple piece of paper, was tested separately, with a grad student in the corner quietly writing down teenagers' purchases as they hit the counter.

The signs stating the percentage of daily caloric intake in a soda reduced sugary purchases by about 40 percent, while merely listing the calories in a drink (which is already listed on the bottle) seemed to have no effect. Instead of buying soda or fruit juice, many kids who read the sign picked water instead. The work was published today in the American Journal of Public Health.

The new federal health care law requires restaurants and vending machines to start labeling the calorie content of food and drink, in an effort to encourage healthy choices. That's expected to kick into gear next year.

Health experts are worried in part because beverage companies increasingly target black and Hispanic kids more than others in their ads. From 2008 to 2010, children's and teens' exposure to television ads for soda doubled, according to a recent report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at Yale University.

But Bleich say her study suggests that it might be better to think about other ways to give people a sense of the caloric load in a soft drink. "Why is it that the minutes of jogging was most effective?" she asks. "My personal feeling is that jogging works because it's a negative thing."

She's going to test that idea by continuing the experiment with signs listing minutes of basketball or minutes of dancing.

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