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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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EPA Creates Website To ID Biggest Emitters Of Greenhouse Gases

Jan 11, 2012
Originally published on January 11, 2012 3:39 pm

Ever wondered who the big greenhouse-gas emitters are in your neck of the woods? The answer is now just a click away.

The US Environmental Protection Agency today unveiled a new website that identifies most of the nation's biggest emitters of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases. It lets you, for example:

-- Click near Macon, Ga., and home in on the nation's largest single-point source of greenhouse gases: the Scherer power plant (actually four huge coal-burning facilities). They pumped out almost 23 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2010 — plus some nitrous oxide and methane gas — to keep the lights on in the region.

-- Click on the icon near Petaluma, Calif., to learn that the local landfill produces 133,000 metric tons of methane, which contributes to both smog and global warming.

The agency was compelled by law to collect and distribute this data to the public. And it's not just a starting point for a science fair project. David Doniger at the Natural Resources Defense Council says that "armed with this right-to-know information, people can demand to know what company executives or elected officials are going to do to curb this pollution."

But what companies can do about it is not often very much. The vast majority of emissions are in the form of carbon dioxide from power plants, which mostly burn coal. Old power plants can be tweaked to become more efficient, which can reduce emissions, but only by a few percent.

Carbon dioxide is not a byproduct of burning, like other pollutants. It's the main product. So you can't do much about it no matter how hard you try. You can't put on scrubbers or emissions controls the way you can to limit mercury, sulfur gases and other byproducts.

A coal plant converted to burn natural gas could cut its carbon dioxide emissions in half, but at great expense. And in the long run it might be possible to capture and bury the carbon dioxide, but that technology is expensive and not ready for prime time.

One other thing about the map that displays emissions from large facilities: It accounts for only about half of all the emissions from the United States. The other half? Those come mostly from tailpipes, chimney flues, trucks, planes and countless smaller operations burning fossil fuels from coast to coast.

Even if it's impossible to pinpoint these endless smaller sources, you can at least see who supplies commodities like natural gas, as it flows through the supply chain on the way to your home furnace. That's a separate database at the EPA website: click here for that.

(Richard Harris is a correspondent on NPR's science desk.)

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