Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

On Energy Policy, Romney's Emphasis Has Shifted

Apr 2, 2012
Originally published on April 2, 2012 11:24 am

The GOP candidates for president have seized on high gas prices as a line of attack against President Obama, largely saying the answer is more domestic oil drilling.

But GOP front-runner Mitt Romney used to have a position seemingly at odds — at least in emphasis — with what he and the other Republicans are now advocating.

As Massachusetts governor, Romney said high gasoline prices "are probably here to stay," and he advocated policies to cut energy demand.

Now, Romney says President Obama's environmental policies are to blame for $4-per-gallon gasoline, and he is pushing for aggressive new oil and gas exploration.

"You see, when he was running, [Obama] talked about how his energy policies would cause energy prices to skyrocket," Romney said last month at a campaign event at Bradley University. "And when told that gasoline prices had jumped, he said that he would rather see them go up gradually."

Romney was referring to a 2008 interview that then-Sen. Barack Obama did with CNBC's John Harwood. When asked if higher gas prices could help the U.S., Obama said he would have "preferred a gradual adjustment."

"The fact that this is such a shock to American pocketbooks is not a good thing," Obama said.

Earlier in the interview, Obama said there wasn't much that could be done to bring prices down artificially. Instead, he said, his energy policy would look to the longer term.

"The only way we're going to deal with these high gas prices is if we change how we consume oil, and that means investing in alternative fuels," he said. "It means that we are raising fuel efficiency standards on cars, that we're helping the automakers retool."

Gov. Romney's Position

Back in May 2006, in the midst of another gas price shock, then-Gov. Romney came to a conclusion similar to Obama's. According to an account from the time in the Patriot Ledger newspaper, Romney objected to a temporary suspension of the state's gas tax, saying he'd rather press for more fuel-efficient vehicles.

"I'm very much in favor of people recognizing that these high gasoline prices are probably here to stay," Romney is quoted as saying in the article.

A month later, on the Charlie Rose show, Romney said the overuse of energy in America is a "major issue" — in particular, the overuse of oil.

"Look, if we could somehow magically wave a wand over our automobile fleet and replace all of our cars with the current best technology, 35 mpg-type technology, we'd be saving an extraordinary amount of oil," Romney said.

But this focus on fuel efficiency wasn't an aberration, and it became part of Romney's energy policy during his 2008 presidential bid.

From the start of his term as governor, Romney worked to promote smart growth, to get people out of their cars, and generally to reduce the state's carbon footprint.

In 2004, Romney introduced the Massachusetts Climate Protection Plan. In more than 50 pages, it laid out emissions targets and what it described as a "no-regrets policy" toward climate change.

"This plan is going to reduce pollution. It's going to cut energy demand," Romney said at a news conference. "It's also going to nurture job growth and boost our economy, because reducing greenhouse gases has multiple benefits."

Environmental advocates at the time wished the plan had gone further but found plenty to cheer.

"He wasn't Al Gore, but he wasn't Sarah Palin, either," says Jim Gomes, who was president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts at the time. He says the plan struck the kind of balance you might expect from a Republican governor in a blue state.

"It has a lot of things in it that could have come out of the Sierra Club," Gomes says. "And there's certainly no hint of 'drill, baby, drill' in it."

Candidate Romney's Position

A lot has changed since then, both in the national dialogue and, seemingly, in Romney's position. Climate change has fallen lower on voter's lists of priorities. And while Romney once said he believes humans contribute to global warming, in October, at Consul Energy in Pennsylvania, he said, "We don't know what's causing climate change, and the idea of spending trillions and trillions of dollars to try and reduce CO2 emissions is not the right course for us."

Five years ago, his emphasis was on efficiency; now it's on drilling. In a video posted by the liberal news site Think Progress, he says, "Let's aggressively develop our oil, our gas, our coal [and] our nuclear power. Look, [the] Marcellus Shale is a huge godsend for the nation. Let's develop it, aggressively."

When asked about Romney's apparent shift in emphasis, if not an outright reversal, his campaign said: "Gov. Romney believes the best way to help lower gas prices is for a long-term structural reform, which is why he supports aggressive action to expand domestic production."

He's not alone in that. President Obama is talking a lot more about drilling these days, too.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

As the Republican presidential hopefuls head into another round of primaries tomorrow, we'll begin this hour drilling down into one of the issues dominating the conversation: gas prices. The GOP candidates have seized on price spikes as a line of attack against President Obama, largely saying the answer is more domestic oil drilling. But one of those candidates, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, used to have a position somewhat contrary to that.

NPR's Tamara Keith reports.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Candidate Mitt Romney says President Obama's environmental policies are to blame for $4 a gallon gas.

MITT ROMNEY: You see, when he was running, he talked about how his energy policies would cause energy prices to skyrocket. And when told that gasoline prices had jumped, he said that he'd rather see them go up gradually.

KEITH: That was Romney last month at a campaign event at Bradley University in Illinois. The last comment he mentions came in a 2008 interview then-Senator Obama did with CNBC's John Harwood.

(SOUNDBITE OF CNBC BROADCAST)

JOHN HARWOOD: So could these high prices help us?

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I think that I would have preferred a gradual adjustment. The fact that this is such a shock to American pocketbooks is not a good thing.

KEITH: Earlier in the interview, Mr. Obama said there wasn't much that could be done to bring prices down artificially. Instead, he said his energy policy would look to the longer term.

(SOUNDBITE OF CNBC BROADCAST)

OBAMA: The only way we're going to deal with these high gas prices is if we change how we consume oil. And that means investing in alternative fuels. It means that we are raising fuel efficiency standards on cars, that we 're helping the automakers retool.

KEITH: Back in May of 2006, in the midst of another gas price shock, then-Governor Romney came to a similar conclusion. According to an account from the time in the Patriot Ledger newspaper, Romney objected to a temporary suspension of the state's gas tax, saying he'd rather press for more fuel-efficient vehicles. The article has him saying, quote, "I'm very much in favor of people recognizing that these high gasoline prices are probably here to stay."

ROMNEY: The issue of the overuse of energy in our country is a major issue. The overuse of oil in particular.

KEITH: This is Romney a month later on "The Charlie Rose Show."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE CHARLIE ROSE SHOW")

ROMNEY: Look, if we could somehow magically wave a wand over our automobile fleet and replace all of our cars with the current best technology, 35 miles per gallon type technology, we'd be saving an extraordinary amount of oil.

KEITH: But this focus on fuel efficiency wasn't an aberration. It became part of Romney's energy policy during his 2008 presidential bid. And from the start of his term as governor, Romney worked to promote smart growth, to get people out of their cars, and generally to reduce the state's carbon footprint.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

ROMNEY: I couldn't me more pleased than to be able to announce this program.

KEITH: The audio of this 2004 press conference is a little scratchy. The program Romney is talking about is the Massachusetts Climate Protection Plan. In more than 50 pages it laid out emissions targets and what it described as a no-regrets policy towards climate change.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

ROMNEY: This plan is going to reduce pollution. It's going to cut energy demand. It's also going to nurture job growth and boost our economy. Because reducing greenhouse gasses has multiple benefits.

KEITH: Environmental advocates at the time wished the plan had gone further but found plenty to cheer.

JIM GOMES: He wasn't Al Gore. But he wasn't Sarah Palin either.

KEITH: Jim Gomes was president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts back then, and says the plan struck the kind of balance you might expect from a Republican governor in a blue state.

GOMES: It has a lot of things in it that could have come out of the Sierra Club. And there's certainly no hint of Drill Baby Drill in it.

KEITH: A lot has changed since then, both in the national dialogue and seemingly in Mitt Romney's position. Climate change has fallen lower on voters' lists of priorities. And Romney has gone from saying he believes humans contribute to global warming to this...

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

ROMNEY: My view is that we don't know what's causing climate change on this planet. And the idea of spending trillions and trillions of dollars to try and reduce CO2 emissions is not the right course for us.

KEITH: This is from a video posted by the liberal news site Think Progress. Romney was speaking last October at Consul Energy in Pennsylvania. Where five years earlier his emphasis was on efficiency, now it's on drilling.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

ROMNEY: Let's aggressively develop our oil, our gas, our coal, our nuclear power. Look, Marcellus Shale is a huge godsend for the nation. Let's develop it aggressively.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

KEITH: When asked about Romney's apparent shift in emphasis, if not an outright reversal, his campaign said Governor Romney believes the best way to help lower gas prices is for a long-term structural reform, which is why he supports aggressive action to expand domestic production.

He's not alone in that. President Obama is talking a lot more about drilling these days too.

Tamara Keith, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.