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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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In Egypt, Islamists Take Control Of A New Parliament

Jan 23, 2012

Egypt's Islamists formalized their new stature on Monday as the first freely elected parliament in six decades held its inaugural session in Cairo.

The session was broadcast live on Egyptian state television and was largely spent swearing in the 508 members, most of whom belong to the Muslim Brotherhood and ultra-conservative Salafist movement.

But outside the parliament, not everyone was celebrating.

Even before the lawmakers could get down to business, many among the hundreds of Egyptians gathered outside parliament made it clear they expected a lot from the new assembly.

There were demands for higher wages. There were cries for justice for the many hundreds of protesters killed by police and soldiers. And there were warnings to Islamist lawmakers not to oppress Egyptians as the previous regime had.

That prompted arguments and scuffles with some pro-Islamist demonstrators, who had come to cheer their new legislators.

One of those celebrating was Mohammed Salama, a 30-year-old English teacher from the northern town of Mansoura, who proudly flashed his Freedom and Justice Party membership card.

The party grew out of the Muslim Brotherhood, which controls nearly half the seats in the new parliament. Its secretary general was elected speaker.

But Salama says that doesn't mean the Brotherhood should dominate the parliamentary agenda, which includes appointing a panel to draft Egypt's new constitution.

"I think all the Egyptian members of the parliament should unite together for the development of Egypt," he says.

Islamist Supporters Want Change

Nevertheless, many supporters of the Islamists are demanding that parliament change Egyptian law to reflect the conservative religious values of the majority.

One such person is 57-year-old Mervat Moharam. She says lawmakers must revise current family law to reflect Islamic norms, like giving fathers greater custody rights and lowering the age when girls can marry.

One Salafist supporter, Mohammed Yousef, predicts the Islamist-dominated parliament won't go far enough to make Islamic law, or Shariah, the law of the land:

"We have previous experiences with similar parliaments in other parts of the world. None of those councils managed to institute Shariah into ... day-to-day life. None of them," he says.

That sort of talk worries protester Dua el- Keshef, a 19-year-old Cairo University student. Like many of her generation, she fears that the Islamists will ultimately try to silence the youth movement that spearheaded last January's revolution.

She argues this parliament is no different than ones under former President Hosni Mubarak, where one faction ended up making all the decisions.

Keshef adds the revolution has failed to deliver the freedom Egyptians deserve.

That message is one many protesters are expected to take to the streets in Cairo and across Egypt on Wednesday — the first anniversary of the revolution that ousted Mubarak and swept the Islamists to power.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.