"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Does Power Really Lie With Bystanders?

May 23, 2012
Originally published on May 23, 2012 1:49 pm

On my route home, there are a couple of stretches I tend to hit where, more often than not, there are a lot of people trying to cross the street at points where there are crosswalks but no stoplights.

And kids being kids, sometimes there's no crosswalk, but they're trying to cross anyway. Increasingly now, because there are new apartments going up, I also see more young working people marching across the street, carrying their take-out dinners, ear buds in place.

I am interested in which motorists stop, and for whom they stop. Do they stop for the little ones all bunched up together, who all seem to be working on identical wads of contraband gum that their mothers will no doubt make them throw out? Do they stop for the harried moms trying to keep the strollers and the walkers moving at the same pace? The too-cool-for-school teens?

Even though I've been watching this dance for a while, I still haven't arrived at a unified theory of the crosswalk. I do think elementary school cuteness seems to confer a slight advantage; teenage bravado, not so much; young professionals, none at all. And why would that be? I think it has something to do with who's watching.

Can I just tell you? It makes me think that the power does not lie with the person trying to make something happen, or even the person trying to stop it, the person crossing, or the motorist deciding whether to stop or not. The power seems to lie with the bystanders.

Once, when I was on my way to work via a different route, I saw a man in one car hit a woman in another and try to get away. But the bystanders wouldn't let him.

There was no meeting, no conference call, no vote. They just blocked his path and kept him in check until the police came. They are the ones who gave the unspoken signal of what would be tolerated and what would not.

So this is my theory about what really affects the hot-button issues, too: same-sex marriage or marriage equality, if you prefer; immigration reform or a path to citizenship, if you prefer — amnesty if you don't.

This is my vision of why and how things will change. It's not so much because of what advocates want or opponents decry — it's because of what bystanders will tolerate.

If you think about it, most of us are bystanders to the big debates of our time. A highly regarded study, which Tell Me More previously reported on, suggests that only 3.8 percent Americans identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, according to demographer Gary Gates of the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law.

While many people argue that allowing same-gender marriage redefines marriage, if the numbers are true, then the real effect is not from same-gender marriages per se. It can't be, because by definition there won't be that many of them. The real effect would have to be on how the rest of us view these folks in relation to ourselves.

As for the issue of immigration, especially illegal immigration, the numbers of immigrants are large enough that you do see changes in communities.

But here again, most of us are not immigrants, legal or illegal, and most of us are affected only tangentially — if we hire or compete in certain labor markets, or if we depend on certain kinds of services. No, most of us are affected in so far as we calculate the costs and benefits of a more expansionist approach versus a more restrictionist one.

I'm not going to predict how either of these two ongoing and powerful debates will be resolved, except that they will be eventually. It's only to remind us that there's much power, not just in what we choose to do, but in what we choose to see, and how we choose to see it.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.