Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Derek Boogaard's Family Sues NHL Over Player's Death In 2011

May 13, 2013

A wrongful death lawsuit has been filed against the NHL by the family of hockey enforcer Derek Boogaard, who was 28 when he died from an accidental overdose of alcohol and oxycodone in May of 2011. The suit accuses the NHL of being negligent and with supplying the painkiller to Boogaard.

"The NHL drafted Derek Boogaard because it wanted his massive body to fight in order to enhance ratings, earnings and exposure. Fighting night after night took its expected toll on Derek's body and mind," attorney William Gibbs said in a statement after filing the suit. "To deal with the pain, he turned to the team doctors, who dispensed pain pills like candy. Then, once he became addicted to these narcotics, the NHL promised his family that it would take care of him. It failed. He died."

Boogard's parents, Joanne and Len, donated Derek's brain to researchers at Boston University, known for its focus on sports-related brain and head trauma. They found early signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease linked to repeated brain trauma.

Drafted by the Minnesota Wild in 2001, Boogaard joined the team in 2005; he later played one season for the New York Rangers. He missed several months of his final season due to injuries.

"He also reportedly participated in 174 career fights in professional hockey," Boston University researchers said, a figure that includes Boogaard's career before reaching the NHL. He is believed to have fought more than 60 times while in the NHL; he scored three goals in the league.

Boogaard had been in a substance abuse recovery program run by the NHL and the players' union, according to The New York Times.

In representing the Boogaard family, Gibbs is joined by fellow attorney Thomas A. Demetrio; the pair "also represent the family of Chicago Bears great Dave Duerson and other NFL players in lawsuits against the league stemming from concussions and CTE," according the their law firm's website.

The lawsuit comes weeks after the Boogaard family's lawsuit against the NHL Players Association was dismissed, the AP reports. That suit, filed last autumn, sought $9.8 million in damages.

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