Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

5 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Delegates To Debate Watered-Down Plan For Antarctic Marine Preserve

Oct 23, 2013
Originally published on October 23, 2013 7:57 pm

Less than 1 percent of the world's oceans are set aside as protected areas, but diplomats meeting now in Australia could substantially increase that figure.

Delegates from 24 nations and the European Union have convened to consider proposals to create vast new marine protected areas around Antarctica.

This same group met over the summer and didn't reach consensus, so it's now considering a scaled-back proposal.

The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources exists principally to regulate fishing around Antarctica. But some members — including the United States — have been pushing the organization to create vast new marine protected areas. One proposed region would shield swaths of the Ross Sea. A second would apply to the waters off East Antarctica. The potential protected areas are getting a push from conservationists like Bob Zuur at WWF-New Zealand.

"Last year I sailed through the Ross Sea," Zuur said at a news conference Wednesday in Hobart, Australia. "I saw dozens of whales, hundreds of seals and albatrosses and thousands of penguins. And that was just the wildlife on top of the water. The wildlife on the seafloor rivals that of the tropics. This area is really the Serengeti of the southern seas."

That advocacy is backed by the scientists who report to CCAMLR (participants call it "camalar"). Marine biologist and fisheries scientist Christopher Jones is chairman of the group's scientific committee. And at the news conference in Australia Wednesday he said members of that committee agree that human activity in the area should be limited, to ensure the long-term health of the ecosystem.

"Whether or not the science is adequate is not the issue here," Jones said. The real issue, he suggested, "is the political will."

CCAMLR already met in July but failed to reach the required consensus to set aside these areas. In particular, conservationists say, Russia and Ukraine balked at creating huge zones where fishing would be off limits forever. Toothfish, sold in the U.S. as Chilean sea bass, is harvested in some of these areas. The marine preserve would still leave some fishing grounds open but would close others, including sensitive spawning grounds of toothfish and other species.

After the July meeting, the United States and New Zealand scaled back the size of the regions of Ross Sea they proposed to protect by 40 percent. That would still make it the largest marine preserve in the world.

"I think all of us were disappointed that the Ross Sea proposal was reduced in size," said Andrea Kavanagh at the Hobart news conference. "We are hopeful this is the last time it will be watered down, and if it's passed as it is, we'd all be quite supportive of it."

Negotiators now plan to spend more than a week seeing whether they can come to a consensus. If they can, that could also open the door to discussions about creating additional marine protected areas around Antarctica. CCAMLR's scientific committee has identified nine areas in seas around the continent as candidates for preservation.

These waters have had less human disturbance than any other oceans on Earth.

"To get a consensus on having this network in place is going to be quite a long process," says Jones, the committee's chairman. "We've already made a lot of progress, though."

One small preserve off the South Orkney Islands is already on the books. And creating one or two vast preserves at this meeting could be a huge step forward.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Less than one percent of the world's oceans are set aside as protected areas. The diplomats meeting now in Australia could substantially increase that figure. Delegates from 24 nations and the European Union have convened to consider proposals to create vast new marine protected areas around Antarctica. This same group met over the summer but didn't reach consensus. As NPR's Richard Harris reports, they're now considering a scaled-back proposal.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: The group is known as CCAMLR, and it exists principally to regulate fishing around Antarctica. But some members of CCAMLR, including the United States, have been pushing the organization to create vast new marine protected areas. One would protect swaths of the Ross Sea, a second would apply to the waters off east Antarctica. The potential protected areas are getting a push from conservationists like Bob Zuur at WWF-New Zealand.

BOB ZUUR: Last year, I sailed through the Ross Sea. I saw dozens of whales, hundreds of seals and albatrosses, thousands of penguins. And that was just the wildlife on top of the water. The wildlife on the seafloor rivals that of the tropics. This area is really the Serengeti of the southern seas.

HARRIS: That advocacy is backed by the scientists who report to CCAMLR. Christopher Jones chairs the group's scientific committee. And at a news conference in Australia today, he said his committee agrees that human activity in the area should be limited in order to assure the long-term health of the ecosystem.

CHRISTOPHER JONES: Whether or not the science is adequate is not an issue here. What is the issue is I guess you'd say the political will.

HARRIS: In July, CCAMLR met but failed to reach a required consensus to set aside these areas. In particular, conservationists say Russia and Ukraine balked at creating huge zones where fishing would be off-limits forever. Toothfish, sold in the U.S. as Chilean sea bass, is harvested in some of these areas. The marine preserve would still leave some fishing grounds open, but it would close others, including sensitive spawning grounds. Bob Zuur from WWF says this remains an issue as the current round of talks gets underway.

ZUUR: Those issues are still on the table and we hope that they'll be addressed. And they should not result in fundamental challenges to what we're actually trying to achieve.

HARRIS: After failing to get consensus at the July meeting, the United States and New Zealand scaled back the size of their Ross Sea proposal by 40 percent. That would still make it the largest marine preserve in the world. Andrea Kavanagh from The Pew Charitable Trusts spoke at a news conference environmentalists held in Australia today.

ANDREA KAVANAGH: I think all of us were disappointed that the Ross Sea proposal was reduced in size. We are hopeful that this is the last time it'll be watered down. And if it's passed as it is, that we'd all be quite supportive of it.

HARRIS: Negotiators plan to spend more than a week now seeing if they can come to a consensus. And if they can, it could also open the door to discussions about more marine protected areas around Antarctica. These waters have had less human disturbance than any other oceans on Earth. Christopher Jones says his scientific committee has studied nine areas around Antarctica that are candidates for preservation.

JONES: To get a consensus on having this network in place, there's going to be quite a long process. We've already made a lot of progress, though.

HARRIS: One small preserve off the South Orkney Islands is already on the books. And creating one or two vast preserves at this meeting could be a huge step forward. Richard Harris, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.