Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Defense: Too Many Documents 'Classifed' In Rosen Leak Case

Jun 4, 2013

The lawyer for Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, a former State Department contractor charged with leaking top-secret information to Fox News, has accused the intelligence community of impeding his defense by slapping the "classified" label on hundreds of irrelevant and harmless documents.

Defense attorney Abbe D. Lowell told a judge in the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., Tuesday that, despite national headlines for the past two weeks, he and his team may be the only people who are not able to name the reporter who published the information (James Rosen) or his news outlet (Fox News), "because the government deems that classified."

Moments later, Lowell said it was "impossible" that all of the documents in dispute in the case deserved special protection because, he said, "it includes communication with Mr. Kim and his kid."

The prosecution of Kim for allegedly sharing a report with Fox News about North Korea's plan to conduct nuclear tests, has attracted new attention amid widespread complaints about the Justice Department's aggressive campaign against national security leaks.

Kim's case is still many months away from trial, lawyers said Tuesday, in part because of what the judge called the "glacial" pace of sharing information and in getting it declassified by the intelligence community.

Add another complication: Attorney General Eric Holder personally approved a search warrant for information from Rosen, the Fox reporter, that characterized him as a "co-conspirator." But after a media uproar, the Justice Department said it never had any intention of prosecuting him over the leak.

Lowell told the judge he was inspecting the materials about how the search warrants in the case were reviewed and approved, because there are indications that they might not have been approved properly. If so, Lowell said, he would be making a motion to suppress those materials.

The hearing put prosecutors from the U.S. attorney's office in Washington in something of a bind.

On the one hand, they indicated they are following directives from the intelligence community, which decides when information can be declassified. And on the other hand, they are fighting Lowell, one of the country's most prominent white-collar defense attorneys who in 2009 pressured the Justice Department to drop a separate leaks prosecution against officials at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Harvey said that for the past two years, they've tried to expedite information-sharing with defense lawyers in the case, which involved turning over more than 3,000 pages of files.

Pressed by U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, Harvey said, "I cannot say whether" all of the materials are properly classified.

"I understand counsel has to deal with various agencies we're calling the intelligence community," Lowell replied, "but they're not making it easy on any of us."

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