Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pages

Defense Contractors See Hope In Homeland Security

Mar 16, 2012
Originally published on March 16, 2012 10:24 am

The Defense Department is bracing for billions of dollars in budget cuts — and that has defense contractors looking for new markets. Homeland Security is one of the most promising, particularly border security, which hasn't suffered any big cuts. So companies are lining up in hopes of landing a contract.

At a border security trade show in Phoenix, Ariz., there's enough surveillance equipment on the floor of the convention center to spot a federal appropriation from 5 miles away.

The Border Security Expo has aerial drones, radio monitors, heat-sensing goggles, even a little blimp with a camera on it. In one area, Bobby Brown stands in front of what he calls a sensor suite.

"A night-imaging camera," he says, "which means you can look into the darkness as if it's daylight. And then a daylight camera for daylight hours, and then on top of it is a radar — a ground surveillance radar."

Brown works for Telephonics Corp., a subsidiary of Boeing. His company already has similar towers along the border. But he's anxious about an upcoming contract to sell more to Customs and Border Protection offices this year.

"That's a $1.6 billion potential award. Billion," he clarifies. "Yes. And I take heartburn medicine every time I think about it."

Maybe that's because cuts at the Pentagon make the civilian market more important. DHS has about $4 billion to spend on technology this year alone.

Border Patrol Chief Mike Fisher is at the border security expo scrutinizing the products "so that me and my staff can actually sit around and make the right decisions for the American tax dollars that, you know, are really critical," he says. "And it's also critical to our border security mission."

Other countries, such as Canada and Mexico, also have representatives here. So do police departments inside the United States. They hope to take advantage of technology developed for war.

Exhibitor Jackie Hoover is showing off a field unit that intercepts and records all radio traffic within a 20-mile radius.

"We have them over actually in Afghanistan," he says. "We have 35 of them set up permanently. And different military has them — different military branches."

On the border, the technology would be used to track drug and people smugglers.

Andrea Groves and Ubaid Tocki demonstrate Raytheon's TransTalk mobile phone app, which directly translates languages. They are developing an English-to-Spanish version. Right now, it works with Arabic and Pashto.

If there's a trend at the show, it's unmanned aerial vehicles — drones. Dave Sliwa from Insitu, another Boeing subsidiary, shows off the 40-pound Night Eagle.

"It's made to fly very silently," he says, "so it can observe things from very close range without being observed itself."

The government sees drones as a cost-effective way to patrol the border. And new models are much cheaper than they used to be, which is one reason defense analyst Loren Thompson says this technology transfer is a good thing.

"Anytime the government can find broader applications for a technology developed primarily for military purposes," he says, "it's saving taxpayers money and it's being more efficient in the broader economy."

The bigger question is whether, in an era of massive budget deficits, the government is getting its money's worth buying this technology at all.

The Department of Homeland Security has been criticized for years for not having clear goals, or not adequately measuring whether it's meeting them. The agency says it hopes to have a more accurate metric — a measurement of border security — sometime this year. In the meantime, the checkbook is open.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Defense Department is bracing for billions of dollars in budget cuts. That has defense contractors looking for new markets. Homeland Security is one promising market, particularly border security where there are no big cuts looming.

Companies are lining up in hopes of landing a contract, as NPR's Ted Robbins found at a border security trade show in Phoenix.

TED ROBBINS, BYLINE: There's enough surveillance equipment on the floor of the Phoenix Convention Center to spot a federal appropriation from five miles away. The Border Security Expo has aerial drones, radio monitors, heat sensing goggles, even a little blimp with a camera on it.

Bobbie Brown is standing in front of what he calls a sensor suite.

BOBBIE BROWN: A night imaging camera, which means you can look into the darkness as though it's daylight, and then a daylight camera for daylight hours. And then on top of it is a radar, a ground surveillance radar.

ROBBINS: Brown works for Telephonics Corporation - a subsidiary of Boeing. His company already has similar towers along the border, but Bobbie Brown is anxious about an upcoming contract to sell Customs and Border Protection more this year.

BROWN: That's a $1.6 billion potential award.

ROBBINS: Billion. Billion with a B.

BROWN: Yes, and I take heartburn medicine every time I think about it.

ROBBINS: Maybe that's because cuts at the Pentagon make the civilian market more important. DHS has about $4 billion to spend on technology, this year alone. Border Patrol Chief Mike Fisher is at the expo scrutinizing the products.

MIKE FISHER: So that me and my staff can actually sit around and make the right decisions for the American tax dollars that, you know, are really critical, and it's also critical to our border security mission.

ROBBINS: Other countries, such as Canada and Mexico, have representatives here. So do police departments inside the U.S. They hope to take advantage of technology developed for war. Jackie Hoover shows me a field unit which intercepts and records all radio traffic within a 20-mile radius.

JACKIE HOOVER: So we have them over, actually, in Afghanistan. We've got 35 of them set up permanently. And then the different military has them - military branches.

ROBBINS: On the border it'd be used to track drug and people smugglers. Andrea Groves and Ubaid Tocki show me Raytheon's Trans Talk mobile phone app. It directly translates languages. They are developing an English to Spanish version. Right now it works with Arabic and Pashto.

ANDREA GROVES: Do you have electricity and water?

(SOUNDBITE OF PHONE APP)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Do you like to sit in water?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (Foreign language spoken)

ROBBINS: The app got it right the second time. If there's a trend at the show, it's unmanned aerial vehicles: drones. Dave Sliwa from Insitu, another Boeing subsidiary, shows me the 40-pound Night Eagle.

DAVE SLIWA: It's made to fly very silently and so it can observe things from very close range without being observed itself.

ROBBINS: The government sees drones as a cost effective way to patrol the border. And new models are much cheaper than they used to be, which is one reason defense analyst Loren Thompson says this technology transfer is a good thing.

LOREN THOMPSON: Any time the government can find broader applications for a technology developed primarily for military purposes, it's saving tax payers money, and it's being more efficient in the broader economy.

ROBBINS: The bigger question is whether in an era of massive budget deficits the government is getting its money's worth buying this technology at all. DHS has been criticized for years for not having clear goals or adequately measuring whether it's meeting them. The agency says it hopes to have a more accurate metric - a measurement of border security - sometime this year. Meanwhile, the checkbook's open.

Ted Robbins, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.