Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Crumbs May Soon Dry Up For New York Subway Rats

Feb 17, 2012

A New York lawmaker wants to put the brakes on eating donuts, and anything else for that matter, in the city's subway system. State Sen. Bill Perkins of Harlem says an eating ban would help combat rats and litter. But, the issue is stirring somewhat of a food fight among subway riders.

We've all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But in today's fast-paced society, a lot of us simply don't have the time to sit down for a morning meal, at least not in the traditional sense. So we do what Norisel Salcedo does — eat on the run. This morning she's munching on a granola bar on her way to work on a southbound D train.

"I'm very hungry and it's breakfast," Salcedo laughs.

Fifteen-year-old Jakaira Caycho knows what that's like. She says she often wolfs down a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich as she rides the rails to school. "I think that people should eat in the subway because kids get hungry and they don't even have time to eat in the house or anything," she says.

Caycho says she has seen a lot of rats in the subway, so she gets what all the fuss is about. But, she also doesn't think an eating ban will solve the problem. Bronx resident Lucy Sailsman disagrees. She says she's tired of seeing people in the subway stuff their faces and leave a smorgasbord of crumbs behind for rodents.

"Eat at home, or wait till you get to work or wherever you're going to eat," Sailsman says.

But, what if you work more than one job to make ends meet? Those are the people subway rider Troy Davis says he worries about.

"If this is your chance to eat, then this is your chance to eat," Davis says. "You gotta figure, if you gotta go from one job and you already had lunch there, but you're trying to make it to the other job and you haven't had dinner yet. You're going to try to put a little something in your system before you get to your other job. You don't want to be late, so you do it on the subway. "

Under the proposed eating ban, subway riders caught noshing could be slapped with a fine of up to $250.

"That's not cool. No way," says rider Bernadette Joseph, upon hearing about the fine.

Joseph says her subway ride to work takes an hour — a commute she calls "breakfast time." This morning she had a granola bar and yogurt.

Harlem resident Randall Iserman says he's seen his fellow subway riders eat just about everything, and he would simply prefer if they refined their habits.

"I'm a little old fashioned and I think it's better if you can sit and eat at a table, preferably either at home or a restaurant or places designed for eating, but I'm not really the person to tell anyone else how they can fit their lives together or fulfill their time," Iserman says.

Or change their morning routines. School teacher Monique Abrams says for her, that would be the hardest part of a ban on eating in the subway.

"Every morning, bagel, butter, iced coffee to get me going in the morning to get up to the Bronx and deal with these kids," Abrams says. "And I don't know, if I didn't have my iced coffee in the morning, what I would do. I would probably start to smoke cigarettes. That wouldn't be good."

Or legal. If the eating ban is approved, Abrams could look to Washington, D.C. or San Francisco commuters for advice on how to cope. Those cities already outlaw eating in the subway.

Copyright 2012 WFUV-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wfuv.org.