Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Coronation Chicken: A Lowly Sandwich Filling With A Royal Pedigree

Jun 4, 2013
Originally published on June 5, 2013 12:46 pm

If you want to eat like a queen, maybe it's time to break out the cold chicken, curry and cream sauce.

Queen Elizabeth II celebrated the 60th anniversary of her coronation in a ceremony Tuesday at Westminster Abbey. But the event also marks the anniversary of a dish as resilient as the British monarch herself: Coronation Chicken.

The recipe was invented as a solution to a conundrum of royal proportions: What to make – in advance – to serve 350 foreign dignitaries attending a banquet following the queen's coronation on June 2, 1953? Oh, and did we mention that Britain was still living under post-war food rations that made many ingredients hard to come by?

"Chicken may be cheap now, but it wasn't then," notes British food historian Gerard Baker. "It was a relative luxury." The use of herbs and spices, says Baker, was also a decadent move at the time, when "few food imports were coming through."

Coronation Chicken, Baker suggests, was the culinary equivalent of the famous British stiff upper lip: "The choice of chicken says, 'We're managing OK now, thank you very much.' "

With its combination of cold meat and a creamy sauce, the dish is rooted in late-medieval cooking. And its mild curry flavors, Baker says, would have been familiar to the monarchy, given the large Indian presence at the Royal Court.

Easy to make at home, The Little Dish That Could soon became one of the most popular dishes of 1950s Britain, writes cultural historian Joe Moran. But in the ensuing decades, the royal treat — now a staple of delis and supermarkets — has lost its sheen of glamour, as the U.K.'s Guardian noted back in 2011.

"How the mighty have fallen. From royal favourite to sadly soggy sandwich-filling in a single reign, coronation chicken has experienced a decline in fortunes that would give even Fergie's accountant cause for concern."

But while the dish may strike some as decidedly retro these days, Her Majesty remains a fan, says Darren McGrady, who spent 11 years cooking for the queen.

Finger sandwiches filled with Coronation Chicken are a staple of afternoon tea at Buckingham Palace, he tells The Salt. " And at Balmoral Castle, where she spends the summer," McGrady says, "Coronation Chicken features heavily."

Given the dish's "peculiar" mix of sweet and savory, historian Baker says, "it's amazing how it's survived."

True, the recipe has been made more sweet over time. But Baker attributes its longevity to it being "not at all avant garde, not offensive. It's very middle of the road."

Perhaps not unlike the queen herself.

Want to take a stab at this queenly meal? Here's a recipe from BBC Food.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.