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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

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As A Coach, Paterno Was One Of A Kind

Jan 25, 2012
Originally published on January 25, 2012 8:20 am

Now that Joe Paterno has passed on from Happy Valley, we must ponder whether we will ever see his like again.

But please: I am now, you understand, talking about Coach Paterno. Let us, for the moment, put aside how the old citizen whose credo was "Success with Honor" acted with regard to pedophilia: so without sensitivity, so irresponsibly, so –– ultimately –– cold-bloodedly. That will sully Paterno's memory forever.

But, simply, for now: Joe Paterno, the coach, which is what he still was — it's hard to recall this now — barely 11 weeks ago. Will, in fact, any college coach ever again possess the power he did over his university?

Well, almost surely not. Paterno's long tenure at an insulated campus, combined with how venerable he became and how upright he was supposed to be in conducting his program, are circumstances unlikely to be duplicated.

On the other hand, to suggest that someone like Nick Saban at Alabama or Urban Meyer, who just took over at Ohio State, do not possess authority far beyond their contractual niceties is naive.

Big-time football coaches are the Cardinal Richelieu among state university royalty — or the Rasputin, if you are of a more cynical bent.

But in the matter of time in grade, Paterno's career will probably never be replicated. Unlike, say, basketball coaches, who are operating in a smaller, more personal universe, football is so much more hierarchical. You have to work your way up: assistant; coordinator; head coach mid-major; head coach big-time. It takes awhile. Paterno was almost 40 before he got his chance.

His closest basketball peers –– like Mike Krzyzewski at Duke, Jim Boeheim at Syracuse, or Dean Smith and Bobby Knight, retired, all made Division-I head coach at an age when football coaches are still plying the ladder.

Moreover, because basketball is more intimate, a coach can better create his own comfortable nest. Besides, because so much more money is involved, there is more pressure on football coaches and less forgiveness for the losers, while the best coaches today are constantly being lured to other colleges by big-money boosters.

As for pro sports, longevity is even more problematic because the players don't turn over every four years, and the veterans stop listening to most coaches after awhile. Even a capable coach moves on.

Of the four major professional team sports, Gregg Popovich of the NBA's San Antonio Spurs has lasted the longest: 15 years. At Penn State, after 15, Paterno still had 31 more years to go.

So, no: When Paterno was fired in November, it concluded a career that we can surely never even imagine again.

In the time he reigned, though, more and more celebrity, veneration and prerogative accrued to college football coaches, and notwithstanding what he did not do in the matter of coach Jerry Sandusky, Joe Paterno had much to do with giving other coaches a sovereignty they never previously possessed.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the wake of the death of Joe Paterno, there's been a lot of talk about the legacy of this legendary Penn State football coach.

Commentator Frank Deford suggests that Paterno did help usher in a golden era of college coaches, and then helped usher it out as well.

FRANK DEFORD, BYLINE: Now that Joe Paterno has passed on from Happy Valley, we must ponder whether we will ever see his like again. But please, I am now, you understand, talking about Coach Paterno. Let us, for the moment, put aside how the old citizen whose credo was Success With Honor, acted with regard to pedophilia: so without sensitivity, so irresponsibly, so ultimately cold-bloodedly. That will sully Paterno's memory forever.

But simply for now: Joe Paterno, the coach, which is what he still was. It's hard to recall this now barely 11 weeks ago. Will, in fact, any college coach ever again possess the power that he did over his university? Well, almost surely not.

Paterno's long tenure at an insulated campus, combined with how venerable he became and how upright he was supposed to be in conducting his program, are circumstances unlikely to be duplicated.

On the other hand, to suggest that someone like Nick Saban at Alabama, or Urban Meyer - who just took over at Ohio State - do not possess authority far beyond their contractual niceties is naive. Big-time football coaches are the Cardinal Richelieu among state university royalty. Or the Rasputin, if you are of a more cynical bent.

But in a matter of time in grade, Paterno's career will probably never be replicated. Unlike, say, basketball coaches who are operating in a smaller, more personal universe, football is so much more hierarchal. You have to work your way up: assistant, coordinator, head coach mid-major, head coach big time. It takes awhile. Paterno was almost 40 before he got his chance.

His closest basketball peers - like Mike Krzyzewski at Duke, Jim Boeheim at Syracuse, or Dean Smith and Bobby Knight, retired, all made Division I head coach at an age when football coaches are still plying the ladder. Moreover, because basketball is more intimate, a coach can better create his own comfortable nest.

Besides, because so much more money is involved, there's more pressure on football coaches - and less forgiveness for the losers - while the best coaches today are constantly being lured to other colleges by big-money boosters.

So no, when Paterno was fired in November, it concluded a career which we can surely never even imagine again. In the time he reigned, though, more and more celebrity, veneration and prerogative accrued to college football coaches. And notwithstanding what he did not do in the matter of Coach Jerry Sandusky, Joe Paterno had much to do with giving other coaches a sovereignty they never previously possessed.

MONTAGNE: Commentator Frank Deford joins us every Wednesday from member station WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.