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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Clinton To Test Myanmar's Readiness For Reforms

Nov 28, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sets off for Asia Monday, and part of her trip will see her as the first U.S. secretary of state to visit Myanmar – formerly known as Burma.

Secretary Clinton says she's going to Myanmar to test the waters to see how committed the country's new leader is to reforms. She'll also meet with Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who is rejoining the political process in the country and who has been guiding U.S. policy, according to activist Aung Din.

"She has been in touch with U.S. authorities all the time," Din says. "U.S. policy right now is being guided by her [and] she's our key figure to unifying the country."

Aung San Suu Kyi, who has spent years in prison and under house arrest, has made it clear that she's ready to work now with Myanmar's new president, Thein Sein, who has begun to open up the country in recent months. Aung Din is not so sure.

"Even though I'm not very confident yet, I have to support it," he says.

Din is a former student activist who spent more than four years in jail before fleeing the country and starting up an advocacy group called U.S. Campaign for Burma. He backed the Obama administration's approach of maintaining sanctions while also trying to engage Myanmar's leaders. He calls Clinton's trip risky, but hopes she will deliver a tough message to the regime.

"I just wish the regime will take this visit seriously and respond positively by making some concessions," he says. "Importantly, the releasing of all remaining political prisoners and ending the civil war with ethnic minorities."

Secretary Clinton told NBC recently that these are all issues that will be high on her agenda.

"They need to begin to look at how they resolve these ethnic conflicts that have driven tens of thousands of Burmese of different ethnicities into refugee status," Clinton said. "They have to have a real electoral system with an open door to political parties and free expression."

Clinton says this is about whether Myanmar is on a path to democracy.

Before going to Myanmar, Clinton will be attending a conference in Busan, South Korea. That's where donor nations and recipients are grappling with another major challenge: tight budgets.

"The background truth that we are facing up to is [that] we are going to have to do a lot more with a lot less," says Paul O'Brien of Oxfam America.

O'Brien says that the conference will bring together donors and developing countries to talk about a deal they had made. If poorer countries clean up corruption and manage their finances better, donors will try to be more predictable with their aid. O'Brien says the latest reports show that donors are not keeping their end of the bargain.

"On the 13 indicators that the donors were supposed to meet, they failed on 12 of them and succeeded on one, and the only one they succeeded on was talking to each other more," he says. "So this whole idea that, 'you guys get your act together, we will trust you more,' is failing."

In the meantime, emerging powers like China have been offering big investments in Africa and Latin America without all the strings attached. They have a lot of money to invest but they don't want to see discussion in the same way around democracy, human rights and transparency, O'Brien says.

"So the real question for the secretary is: is she going to be able to move the discussion back towards what we were all there for in the first place?" he says. "Let's get these countries to be more accountable and let's hold them accountable and let's make sure their citizens can hold them accountable [That's] the deeper political agenda that we have all been working on for many decades."

That's an agenda Secretary Clinton will be trying to push both in Korea and in Myanmar this week.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.