Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Clinton Steps Up Calls For A Halt To Violence In Syria

Feb 25, 2012
Originally published on March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Syrians are looking to the world in their hour of need and "we cannot let them down," U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Friday at an international conference on Syria held in Tunisia.

The dozens of countries represented at the conference, Clinton said, are united in their demands: Syrian President Bashar Assad must allow much-needed aid to his people and silence his guns or face more isolation and pressure.

But debate continues over what other steps countries in the region could take.

At the conference, which ended Friday, Clinton announced $10 million in U.S. humanitarian aid for Syrians and promised more to come. She also had more tough words for Assad and a message for those supporting him.

"Their continuing to kill their brothers and sisters is a stain on their honor. Their refusal to continue this slaughter will make them heroes in the eyes of not only Syrians but people of conscience everywhere," Clinton said. "They can help the guns fall silent."

She says there are signs that people around Assad are hedging their bets. Many of them, she says, did not sign up to slaughter people.

The Tunisian gathering — of the group known as Friends of Syria — was meant in part to send signals to those surrounding Assad to defect and to countries like Russia and China to stop giving the Syrian leader diplomatic cover.

"It is just despicable. And I ask, whose side are they on? They are clearly not on the side of the Syrian people," Clinton said. "And they need to ask themselves some very hard questions about what that means for them, as well as the rest of us."

What The Opposition Needs

Syria's largest opposition group, the Syrian National Council — which Clinton calls a legitimate voice for Syrians — came to the conference in Tunisia to lay out its vision of a post-Assad Syria.

Kamal al-Labwani, who spent 10 years as a political prisoner in Syria and now lives in exile, is a member of the group. He says its plan is to form an inclusive government.

"We speak about a new history for all the territory [of the] Middle East," he says. "This revolution is promising to change everything."

The opposition needs all the help it can get, Labwani adds. While the talk in Tunisia was formally about humanitarian aid, he says the idea of arming the opposition was the talk of the corridors.

"On the table, we speak about peaceful support. But under the table, we always asked something different," he says. "If you want to be active, you have to close your eyes about smuggling weapons to Syria. You have to give the green light to the states surrounding Syria to let the smugglers take weapons inside Syria. What we need is this."

The host of the meeting — Tunisia's foreign minister — says shipping in arms is risky. But Saudi Arabia's foreign minister called it an excellent idea. Clinton remained focused on the consensus issue — that Assad needs to allow in aid – and said no one wants a prolonged conflict.

But activists say there needs to be safe corridors so people can flee and aid can get in. Stephanie Brancaforte is an activist with an organization called Avaaz, which has been working with citizen journalists in Syria and trying to help bring in supplies.

"The real test for this conference is when bombs stop falling, and the ambulances and the humanitarian aid start arriving in the besieged cities," Brancaforte says.

For now, she says, she hears only troubling news.

"It's an absolutely desperate situation," she says. "Families can't flee. When they do, they're shot by snipers. And children are being killed, children are having to bury their parents."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simons. Syrians are looking to us in their hour of need and we cannot let them down. Those were the words of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the end of an international conference in Syria held in Tunisia yesterday. She says the dozens of countries represented at the conference are united in their demands that President Bashar al-Assad must allow much needed aid to get into his people and silence his guns or face more isolation and pressure. But as NPR's Michele Keleman reports, there is a lot of debate about what other steps countries in the region could take.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Secretary Clinton came away from a hectic day of meetings with more tough words for Bashar al-Assad, and a message for those supporting him.

SECRETARY HILLARY CLINTON: Their continuing to kill their brothers and sisters is a stain on their honor. Their refusal to continue this slaughter will make them heroes in the eyes of not only Syrians but people of conscience everywhere. They can help the guns fall silent.

KELEMEN: She says there are signs that people around Assad are hedging their bets. Many of them, she says, did not sign up to slaughter people. The of the so-called Friends of Syria group was meant in part to send signals to those around Assad to defect and to countries like Russia and China to stop giving the Syrian leader diplomatic cover.

CLINTON: It is just despicable. And I ask, whose side are they on? They are clearly not on the side of the Syrian people. And they need to ask themselves some very hard questions about what that means for them, as well as the rest of us.

KELEMEN: The Syrian National Council - which Clinton calls a legitimate voice for Syrians - came to the conference in Tunisia to lay out its vision of a post-Assad Syria. One council member is Kamal al-Labwani, who spent 10 years as a political prisoner in Syria and now lives in exile. He says the plan is to form an inclusive government.

KAMAL AL-LABWANI: We speak about a new history for all the territory for Middle East, new history. This revolution is promising to change everything.

KELEMEN: And he says the opposition needs all the help it can get. While the talk in Tunisia was formally about humanitarian aid, Labwani says the idea of arming the opposition was the talk of the corridors.

AL-LABWANI: On the table, we speak about peaceful support. But under the table, we always asked something different. If you want to be active, you have to close your eyes about smuggling weapons to Syria. You have to give the green light to the states surrounding Syria to let the smugglers take weapons inside Syria. What we need is this.

KELEMEN: The host of the meeting - Tunisia's foreign minister - says shipping in arms is risky. But Saudi Arabia's foreign minister called it an excellent idea. Secretary Clinton stayed focused on the consensus issue, that Assad needs to allow in aid, and said no one wants a prolonged conflict. But activists say there is a need for safe corridors so people can flee and aid can get in. Stephanie Brancaforte is an activist with an organization called Avaaz, which has been working with citizen journalists in Syria and trying to help bring in supplies.

STEPHANIE BRANCAFORTE: The real test for this conference is when bombs stop falling and the ambulances and the humanitarian aid start arriving in the besieged cities.

KELEMEN: For now, she says, she hears only troubling news.

BRANCAFORTE: It's an absolutely desperate situation. I mean, families can't flee. When they do, they're shot by snipers. And children are being killed, children are having to bury their parents.

KELEMEN: Secretary Clinton announced an additional $10 million in U.S. humanitarian aid for Syrians and promised more to come. Michele Keleman, NPR News, Tunis. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.