Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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Climate Politics: It's Laugh Lines Vs. 'Not A Joke'

Oct 17, 2012
Originally published on October 18, 2012 12:11 pm

Scientists view climate change as one of the world's most pressing long-term problems. But the issue has barely surfaced in the U.S. presidential race. President Obama has taken steps to address climate change during his time in office. Republican challenger Mitt Romney would not make it a priority in his administration.

In fact, as Romney stood on the stage to accept his nomination at the Republican National Convention, he used global warming as a laugh line.

"President Obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans," he said, pausing for the applause and laughter to rise, "and to heal the planet."

Romney promised an administration that would instead focus on taking care of American families. Obama rebutted that comment at the Democratic National Convention a week later.

"Change is not a hoax," he said. "More droughts and floods and wildfires are not a joke. They are a threat to our children's future. And in this election, you can do something about it."

In fact, Obama came into office with climate change as one of his major issues. At international talks in Copenhagen, he pledged to reduce U.S. emissions by 17 percent over 2005 levels by the year 2020. At that meeting and since, he pressed to get more aggressive action out of China, India and the world's other biggest carbon dioxide emitters.

But the president's plans didn't make it past strong Republican opposition in Congress. So instead, he has settled for actions the president can take without congressional action.

"First there was the stimulus, which is the largest ever investment in clean energy technology, really hoping to jump-start that sector," says Carol Browner, who is an adviser to the Obama campaign on energy and climate issues, and former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. She runs down a quick list of accomplishments: "The first ever greenhouse gas standards for cars, the power plant requirements — proposed new power plant requirements — as well as more efficient appliances."

These don't add up to the 17 percent reduction the president aspired to at the Copenhagen climate talks. Browner says he will keep trying to make incremental changes.

So this is an issue where the candidates sharply disagree.

The president sees action on climate change as creating new jobs in the clean-energy sector.

Romney sees cheap energy as the best energy. He doesn't even mention climate change in his energy plan, which is overwhelmingly about increasing production of fossil fuels.

The Romney campaign would not provide a spokesman for this report. But the campaign's domestic policy adviser, Oren Cass, did address these issues at a debate at MIT, which was webcast by E&ETV.

"Gov. Romney's position on climate change is very straightforward, which is that the United States taking action unilaterally is not able to address what is a global problem," Cass said.

And since China is still building more coal-fired power plants every week, Cass argues that having the U.S. cut emissions is a waste of effort.

He also opposes what was once a Republican-backed idea: Put a price on carbon pollution to encourage the free market to develop technologies that are better for human health and the global environment. He says pricing carbon won't work.

"What it is going to do is hurt our economy very seriously," Cass says, "and is going to drive a lot of industrial activity from the United States to countries that are, frankly, less efficient in their use of energy."

And less efficient countries produce more carbon dioxide, potentially making the problem worse.

So, in essence, the Romney position is that climate change won't be a priority because it's too hard to solve. The one action the campaign has advocated is spending more federal dollars for research on climate science and renewable energy.

That's a contrast with President Obama, who argues that developing clean energy is good for the U.S. economy — and important on the world stage, where climate change is regarded as a very serious issue.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's interesting that one of the most serious environmental issues, climate change, has barely surfaced in the presidential race. President Obama has taken some steps to address climate change. Republican challenger Mitt Romney says he would not make it a priority in his administration. In our series Solve This, NPR's Richard Harris looks ahead to the very different ways climate change policy could go over the next four years, depending on who is elected president.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: As Mitt Romney stood on the stage to accept his nomination at the Republican National Convention, he made a rare mention of global warming, and he used it as a laugh line.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

MITT ROMNEY: President Obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planet.

HARRIS: Romney promised an administration that would instead focus on taking care of American families. President Obama rebutted that comment at the Democratic National Convention a week later.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Change is not a hoax. More droughts and floods and wildfires are not a joke. They are a threat to our children's future, and in this election, you can do something about it.

HARRIS: In fact, Mr. Obama came into office with climate change as one of his major issues. At international talks in Copenhagen, he pledged to reduce U.S. emissions sharply by the year 2020. And he pressed to get more aggressive action out of China, India and the world's other biggest carbon dioxide emitters. But the president's plans didn't make it past strong Republican opposition in Congress. So, instead, he has settled for actions the president can take without congressional action.

CAROL BROWNER: First, there was the stimulus, which is the largest ever investment in clean energy technologies, really hoping to jump-start that sector.

HARRIS: Carol Browner is an adviser to the Obama campaign on energy and climate issues. She runs down a quick list.

BROWNER: The first-ever greenhouse gas standards for cars, the power plant requirements - new proposed power plant requirements, as well as more efficient appliances.

HARRIS: These don't add up to the 17 percent reduction the president aspired to at the Copenhagen climate talks. Browner says he will keep trying to make incremental changes. So this is an issue where the candidates sharply disagree. The president sees action on climate change as creating new jobs in the clean-energy sector. Romney sees cheap energy as the best energy. He doesn't even mention climate change in his energy plan, which is overwhelmingly about increasing production of fossil fuels. The Romney campaign would not provide a spokesman for this report. But the campaign's domestic policy adviser, Oren Cass, did address these issues at a debate at MIT, which was webcast by E&ETV.

(SOUNDBITE OF DEBATE)

OREN CASS: Governor Romney's position on climate change is very straightforward, which is that the United States, taking action unilaterally, is not able to effectively address what is a global problem.

HARRIS: And since China is still building more coal-fired power plants every week, Cass argues having the U.S. cut emissions is a waste of effort. He also opposes what was once a Republican-backed idea: put a price on carbon pollution to encourage the free market to develop technologies that are better for human health and the global environment. He says pricing carbon won't work.

(SOUNDBITE OF DEBATE)

CASS: What it is going to do is hurt our economy very seriously, and it's going to drive a lot of industrial activity from the United States to countries that are, frankly, much less efficient in their use of energy.

HARRIS: So, in essence, the Romney position is that climate change won't be a priority because it's too hard to solve. Romney says the government's response should be to fund research on climate science and renewable energy. That's a contrast with President Obama, who argues that developing clean energy is good for the U.S. economy and is an important step toward addressing what is perceived worldwide as a very serious issue. Richard Harris, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This is NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.