The new British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her cabinet today.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Chronic Insomnia? Hitting The Treadmill Could Help ... Eventually

Aug 15, 2013
Originally published on August 19, 2013 10:32 am

Studies on exercise and sleep come up with the same conclusion time after time: If you want to hit the hay earlier and sleep better, get a good cardio workout.

But if you're already sleep-deprived, don't expect a 30-minute run or stint on the elliptical to knock you out quicker tonight.

The sleep-boosting effects of exercise can take a few months to kick in for people who suffer insomnia, scientists report Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

"It's a long-term relationship," explains sleep psychologist Kelly Glazer Baron, who led the study. The benefits are worth the wait.

After four months, adding 30 minutes of exercise, three times a week, bumped up insomniacs' sleep by about 45 minutes each night, Baron says. "That's huge. It's as large or larger an effect than what you see with [sleep] drugs."

The current study is small. Baron and her colleagues at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine tracked sleep and exercise patterns in just 23 women over the age of 55 who had been wrestling with chronic insomnia.

"But the analysis is powerful," she says, "because we had data for each woman every day for 16 weeks."

Baron generally treats people who have chronically lousy sleep with cognitive behaviorial therapy. But she also recommends regular exercise for all her patients — 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise, three to four times a week.

"My clients were coming in and saying, 'I did what you said. I exercised so hard, but I didn't sleep very well,' " Baron says.

When she looked back at her data, she found that her clients were right: The amount of exercise during one day didn't correlate with how much the person slept that night. But the inverse was true. "How much they slept at night was linked to how much they exercised the next day," she says. "Sleep was driving the exercise."

So what does that mean for the rest of us exhausted workaholics?

"Not sleeping well makes you not want to exercise," she says. "But those are the days that you need to do it more. It will help you in the long run."

Several studies in the lab have found that working out right before bed may make it harder to fall asleep, Baron says. A recent survey by the National Sleep Foundation challenged that long-standing belief. But she still recommends that people who have chronic insomnia exercise more toward the middle of the day.

To get over the "too-tired-to-exercise" trap, Baron suggests planning your workouts in advance or leaving notes around the house reminding you it's worth the effort.

"I'm an exerciser," she says. "But I would just lie in the bed a little longer in the morning. So I have to pre-plan my workouts. You've got to just put on the shoes and get out the door."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.