Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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As China's Military Grows, U.S. Assesses Risks

Feb 14, 2012

At the White House on Tuesday, President Obama greeted China's Vice President Xi Jinping and called for cooperation between the two nations.

Later in the day, the Chinese vice president crossed the Potomac to visit the Pentagon, where the U-S military may hope for cooperation, but has to plan for possible confrontation.

The Pentagon's new budget request, unveiled Monday, signals a shift for the US military, with a greater focus on the Pacific.

China is building more ships and aircraft, and is now patrolling hundreds of miles out into the Pacific.

China's satellites and surveillance aircraft are shadowing American carrier groups. Its warships are provoking Japanese and Vietnamese ships. China's military might, says the new Pentagon strategy, is causing friction in the region.

"Rising powers in Asia are testing international rules and relationships," Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday. "We will rebalance our global posture and presence to emphasize Asia Pacific and the Middle East, because those areas represent the threats for the future."

Panetta didn't say China was one of those threats. Yet no one doubts that China is the reason the U.S. will maintain eleven aircraft carriers, develop a new long-range bomber, and work with allies like Australia and Singapore to base combat troops and ships in those countries.

Chinese Intentions Unclear

For the most part, though, China's intentions remain a question mark.

"What type of force is China building and why are they building it? And what does that mean for the region?" asks

David Finkelstein, a China expert at the Center for Naval Analyses, a government think tank. "We're really at a point now where for the first time China has accrued operational capability to project force further out from their shores and in their airspace than ever before."

Finkelstein says that Chinese military leaders believe they are a global economic power, and must create a military to protect their interests.

That's why the Pentagon is pushing for that new long-range bomber and stealth aircraft. They could be used to penetrate Chinese airspace, largely unseen.

Cyber Threats

But the idea of a Chinese military that can really challenge the United States is still a long way off.

A more immediate concern is China's skill at cyberattacks — the ability to hack into or even destroy computer systems, both commercial and military.

Chinese military strategists have made cyber war-fighting capability a priority. So the new Pentagon budget sets aside more than $3 billion for cyber operations and defense.

At Tuesday's Senate hearing, Republican Lindsey Graham of South Carolina asked Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Martin Dempsey, about the growing cyber capabilities of China's military.

Dempsey said he would consider cyber attacks to be a crime, or possibly even a "hostile act."

Graham told Dempsey he would be having lunch soon with China's vice president.

"So what do you want me to tell him?" Graham said.

"Happy Valentine's Day," Dempsey replied.

The committee chairman, Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat from Michigan, told Graham to pass on another message: cyberattacks from China are mighty serious stuff and must stop.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.