"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Chicago Outsider Busted Crime With Apolitical Flare

May 26, 2012
Originally published on May 26, 2012 2:16 pm

Patrick Fitzgerald, the federal prosecutor who went after the Gambino crime family, al-Qaida and even the White House in court — not to mention several Illinois politicians — is leaving his job as U.S. attorney in Chicago.

The career prosecutor, known as "Eliot Ness with a Harvard degree," will leave a legacy as a tenacious corruption buster, though some criticize his style as overzealous.

Even though they are presidential appointees, U.S. attorneys are supposed to be as apolitical as possible. Some say Fitzgerald took the political independence of the U.S. attorneys office in Chicago to a whole new level.

"I don't think there's any assistant who's ever worked under Pat that ever questioned whether or not his decisions were ever based on politics, because they never were," says former assistant U.S. attorney Jeff Kramer, who worked under Fitzgerald. "You knew when Pat made a decision, it was based on the law and what his office dictated."

Fitzgerald came to Chicago in September 2001 as the ultimate outsider. In New York, he'd been prosecuting terrorism and organized crime cases. The hope at the time was for a U.S. attorney with no Illinois political ties who would be willing to go after corruption in both parties.

Andy Shaw, president of the watchdog Better Government Association, says Fitzgerald fit the bill.

"And the best example of that is he put two governors in jail, one from each party," he says.

Former Republican Gov. George Ryan is serving six and a half years. Former Democratic Gov. Rod Blagojevich is serving 14 years — both for corruption.

But the list of Fitzgerald's convictions doesn't stop there. Media mogul Conrad Black, several mob bosses and a former police commander who abused and tortured suspects all went to prison on Fitzgerald's watch.

So, too, did the chief of staff to former Vice President Dick Cheney, Lewis "Scooter" Libby, whom Fitzgerald snared as a special prosecutor investigating the leak that outed CIA operative Valerie Plame. But as he discussed his decision this week to step down, Fitzgerald said he doesn't take a lot of joy in those victories.

"You did a fair trial, you won, and there's an empty feeling in your stomach when you realize that someone else is going off to prison. That doesn't change," he said. "Imprisonment is just not a good thing. It's a necessary evil at times, and I use those words meaning both words."

Fitzgerald says criminals must be locked up but that anyone who thinks prison is a productive use of anyone's time is deluding themselves.

Fitzgerald says he does have regrets. Among them are the harsh words he used when announcing the arrest of then-Gov. Blagojevich in December 2008. Fitzgerald called Blagojevich's actions "a political corruption crime spree" that "would make Lincoln roll over in his grave."

"It seemed like a good idea at the time, which tells you that ... in all seriousness, I probably could have had a colder shower, a little more sleep and some decaf," he says.

Do those words provide any solace now to the brother of the former governor? Not so much.

Robert Blagojevich was indicted along with his more infamous brother as the head of the governor's campaign fund. He says those words polluted the jury pool and that his presumption of innocence was lost.

Furthermore, Robert Blagojevich sharply criticizes the tactics Fitzgerald used in trying to get him to testify against his brother, and he's glad to see Fitzgerald go.

"I think he overreached in indicting me and using me as a pawn to get to my brother," he says, "and so I think it's a good day for civil liberties, and it's long overdue, in my opinion."

Robert Blagojevich spent almost $1 million to defend himself, only to have Fitzgerald eventually drop the charges. Others have criticized Fitzgerald for being overzealous in how broadly he applies the law. Fitzgerald dismisses such complaints.

As for what's next for the star U.S. attorney, Fitzgerald says he really has no idea yet, but the one thing he rules out is a run for office.

"I'm not wired to campaign for anything or run for elective office. Period," he says.

Fitzgerald leaves the U.S. attorneys office on June 30.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Patrick Fitzgerald, the federal prosecutor who went after the Gambino crime family, al-Qaida and the White House in court, and took the pelts off several Illinois politicians, is leaving his job as U.S. attorney in Chicago. The career prosecutor who was often compared to Elliot Ness, leaves a legacy as a corruption buster, but there are some who've criticized his conduct as overzealous. From Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: Even though they are presidential appointees, U.S. attorneys are supposed to be as apolitical as possible. But some say Patrick Fitzgerald took the political independence of the U.S. attorneys office in Chicago to a whole new level. Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeff Kramer worked under Fitzgerald.

JEFF KRAMER: I don't think there's any assistant who's ever worked under Pat that ever questioned whether or not his decisions were ever based on politics - because they never were. You knew that when Pat made a decision, it was based upon the law and what his office dictated.

SCHAPER: Patrick Fitzgerald came to Chicago in September of 2001 as the ultimate outsider. In New York, he'd been prosecuting terrorism and organized crime cases. The hope at the time was for a U.S. attorney with no Illinois political ties who'd be willing to go after corruption in both parties. Andy Shaw is with the watchdog group, the Better Government Association. He says Fitzgerald fit the bill.

ANDY SHAW: And the best example of that is he put two governors in jail, one from each party.

SCHAPER: Former Republican Governor George Ryan is serving six and a half years; former Democratic Governor Rod Blagojevich is serving 14 years - both for corruption. But the list of Fitzgerald's convictions doesn't stop there. Media mogul Conrad Black, several mob bosses, and a former police commander who abused and tortured suspects, all went to prison on Fitzgerald's watch. So too did the chief of staff to former Vice President Dick Cheney, Lewis "Scooter" Libby, whom Fitzgerald snared as a special prosecutor investigating the leak of a CIA operative's name. But as he discussed his decision this week to step down, Fitzgerald said he doesn't take a lot of joy in of those victories.

PATRICK FITZGERALD: You did a fair trial, you won, and there's an empty feeling in your stomach when you realize that someone else is going to prison. That doesn't change. Imprisonment is just not a good thing. It's a necessary evil at times, and I use those words meaning both words.

SCHAPER: Fitzgerald says criminals must be locked up but that anyone who thinks prison is a productive use of anyone's time is deluding themselves. Fitzgerald says he does have regrets. Among them are the harsh words he used when announcing the arrest of then Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in December of 2008. Fitzgerald called Blagojevich's actions a political corruption crime spree that would make Lincoln roll over in his grave.

FITZGERALD: It seemed like a good idea at the time...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

FITZGERALD: ...which tells you that, no, in all seriousness, I probably could have had a colder shower, a little more sleep and some decaf.

SCHAPER: Do those words provide any solace now to the brother of the former governor?

ROBERT BLAGOJEVICH: No, no.

SCHAPER: Robert Blagojevich was indicted along with his more infamous brother as the head of the governor's campaign fund. He says those words polluted the jury pool and that his presumption of innocence was lost. Furthermore, Robert Blagojevich sharply criticizes the tactics Fitzgerald used in trying to get him to testify against Rod. And he's glad to see Fitzgerald go.

BLAGOJEVICH: I think he overreached in indicting me and using me as a pawn to get to my brother. And so I think it's a good day for civil liberties and it's long overdue, in my opinion.

SCHAPER: Blagojevich spent almost a million dollars to defend himself, only to have Fitzgerald eventually drop the charges. Others have criticized Fitzgerald for being overzealous in how broadly he applies the law. Fitzgerald dismisses such complaints. As for what's next for the star U.S. attorney, Fitzgerald says he really has no idea yet. But the one thing he rules out is a run for office.

FITZGERALD: I'm not wired to campaign for anything or run for elective office, period.

SCHAPER: Patrick Fitzgerald leaves the U.S. attorneys office June 30th. David Schaper, NPR News, Chicago. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.