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Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

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At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Can May Polls Predict A November Winner?

May 26, 2012
Originally published on May 26, 2012 10:52 am

A Quinnipiac University poll out this week found Mitt Romney with a 6-point lead over President Obama in Florida. That would seem to be very good news for the presumptive Republican nominee in what may be the biggest swing state this fall.

Except another poll, done at the same time by Marist College and NBC News, found Romney trailing Obama in Florida by 4 percentage points.

So, which is correct? And should voters and the campaigns even pay attention to state or national polls so far before the election?

Predicting Tomorrow, Today

Pollsters often ask: "If the election were held today, who would you vote for?" And right there you have a fundamental problem, says Eric Mogilnicki, a Democrat, who was chief of staff to the late Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy.

The election is not being held today.

"There are so many things that are going to happen in the next six months," says Mogilnicki. "There's going to be literally a billion dollars in ads on TV, and those are going to make a difference. Economic conditions are going to make a difference. There could be events overseas that can't be anticipated now. There's going to be debates."

"Both sides are going to be working on a field organization to turn out the vote," says Mogilnicki. "It's way too early to make any assumptions about what the elections are going to be like."

Nonetheless, polls and polling stories are everywhere in the media.

Republican Jack Howard — who has worked for leaders in the House, Senate and the White House — compares it to baseball standings.

"Look at the Washington Nationals, and they're in first place. They've got a great record. But fast-forwarding that all the way to the playoffs and the World Series, you know, is a stretch," says Howard.

Helpful Hints

Still, Howard says that even this far out, polls mean a lot to the campaigns.

"I think there's a lot of value to getting a real-time fix on where you're at, what your weak spots are and what your strengths are so you can kind of calibrate your campaign," says Howard.

For example, polls last month showed President Obama with a wide lead over Romney among women.

The Romney campaign shifted strategy, and this month, polls suggest that Romney has shrunk the gender gap.

Democratic strategist Maria Cardona says you can see the same thing happening right now with Latino voters: Polls show Obama with a wide lead; Romney is trying to shrink it.

"We saw him speak to a Latino business summit," Cardona says of Romney. "He also just accepted a speaking engagement to a group of Latino elected officials in June. So polls this far out let the campaigns understand what the trends are, because two months out, one month out, it's going to be too late to change that trend."

The Momentum Factor

These polls can also have a big impact on fundraising, says Republican strategist Bruce Haynes.

"Donors like to support campaigns that they feel are going somewhere, that have an opportunity to win, that have that critical momentum behind them," says Haynes.

And he says these early polls also can mobilize people who don't give money.

"They generate momentum in terms of energy around the campaigns, how are volunteers looking at the campaign," says Haynes. "Is this a campaign that I want to support, knock on doors for, put a bumper sticker on my car for?"

So while running poorly in polls can kill a candidate, getting too far ahead can hurt, too.

"What both campaigns can claim, which is a good thing for mobilization, is that they are the underdog," says Cardona, who is already seeing this play out in the Romney and Obama camps.

"What they're saying to their base is essentially: 'This is going to be a really tight election. Your vote is going to matter more so now than in any other election in the past,' " says Cardona.

What the polls can't tell you this far out is who's going to win. On the other hand, the candidate who led in the polls in June wound up winning in three of the past four presidential races.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This week, a poll done by Quinnipiac University found that Mitt Romney has a six-point lead over President Obama in the state of Florida. Now, that would seem to be very good news for the likely Republican nominee in what may be the biggest swing state this fall, except another poll done at the same time by Marist College and NBC News, found Mr. Romney behind in Florida by four points.

In a moment we'll talk with two well-respected pollsters about how to see these wide differences in results. But first, NPR's Ari Shapiro asks whether we should pay attention to state polls or national polls so far before the election.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Pollsters often ask: If the election were held today, who would you vote for? And right there you have a fundamental problem, says Eric Mogilnicki. The election is not being held today.

ERIC MOGILNICKI: There are so many things that are going to happen in the next six months.

SHAPIRO: Mogilnicki is a Democrat who was chief of staff to the late Senator Ted Kennedy.

MOGILNICKI: There's going to be literally a billion dollars in ads on TV, and those are going to make a difference. Economic conditions are going to make a difference. There could be events overseas that can't be anticipated now. There's going to be debates. Both sides are going to be working on a field organization to turn out the vote. It's way too early to make any assumptions about what the elections are going to be like.

SHAPIRO: Nonetheless, polls and polling stories are everywhere in the media. Republican Jack Howard compares it to baseball standings. He has worked for leaders in the House, Senate and the White House.

JACK HOWARD: You look at the Washington Nationals, and they're in first place. They've got a great record. But fast-forwarding that all the way to the playoffs and the World Series, you know, is a stretch.

SHAPIRO: Still Howard says that even this far out, polls mean a lot to the campaigns.

HOWARD: I think there's a lot of value to getting a real-time fix on where you're at, what your weak spots are and, you know, what your strengths are, so you can kind of calibrate your campaign.

SHAPIRO: For example, last month polls showed that President Obama held a wide lead over Romney among women. The Romney campaign shifted strategy, and this month, polls suggest that Romney has shrunk the gender gap. Democratic strategist Maria Cardona says you can see the same thing happening right now with Latino voters. Polls show President Obama with a wide lead there, Romney is trying to shrink it.

MARIA CARDONA: We saw him speak to a Latino business summit. He also just accepted a speaking engagement to a group of Latino elected officials in June. So polls this far out let the campaigns understand what the trends are, because two months out, one month out, it's going to be too late to change that trend.

SIMON: These polls can also have a big impact on fundraising says Republican strategist Bruce Haynes.

BRUCE HAYNES: Donors like to support campaigns that they feel are going somewhere, that have an opportunity to win, that have that critical momentum behind them.

SHAPIRO: And he says these early polls also can mobilize people who don't give money too.

HAYNES: They generate momentum in terms of energy around the campaigns, how are volunteers looking at the campaign. Is this a campaign that I want to support? Is this a campaign I want to be involved in, knock on doors for, put a bumper sticker on my car for?

SHAPIRO: So while running poorly in polls can kill a candidate, getting too far ahead can hurt, too.

CARDONA: What both campaigns can claim, which is a good thing for mobilization, is that they are the underdog.

SHAPIRO: Democratic strategist Cardona is already seeing this play out in the Romney and Obama camps.

CARDONA: What they're saying to their base is essentially, this is going to be a really tight election. Your vote is going to matter more so now than in any other election in the past.

SHAPIRO: What the polls cannot tell you this far out is who's going to win. On the other hand, the candidate who led in the polls in June wound up winning in three of the past four presidential races. Ari Shapiro, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.