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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Bringing Audi Back, For A Younger Audience

Nov 29, 2011

Despite the sluggish economy, it's been a pretty good year for luxury carmakers. Deluxe brands such as Mercedes, Volvo and BMW have seen double-digit growth.

But the German carmaker Audi is the standout. It's seen a near tenfold growth in the past 20 years, and the company has also become the new status car for young urban professionals.

In the pop star car commercial smackdown, the Fiat 500 flaunts Jennifer Lopez, Chrysler rolls with Eminem, and Audi — not to be outdone — produced a whole series of Internet thriller movies with Justin Timberlake.

Not only has Timberlake brought sexy back, he also helped do the same for Audi. The company uses viral marketing that focuses on very young consumers. Timberlake is about a decade younger than JLo or Eminem.

"We have the most affluent consumer for the most part, and we do have the youngest consumer," says Scott Keogh, head of marketing at Audi. "It's an average age of somewhere around 47 or 48 [years old], and most of our competitors are ... deep into the 50s."

But Keogh doesn't exactly call it the yuppie crowd.

"Because I'll give you my definition or, I think, of how you're giving a definition of the yuppie, [as] crass, aggressive, somewhat in-your-face flashy money, and I think that is the exact opposite of what Audi is," he says.

Whether they're called yuppies or not, Audi is winning young consumers in the U.S., where it's gone from about 1 percent of the luxury car market to nearly 10 percent in 20 years. But Audi has come a lot further than that.

Almost exactly 25 years ago, Audi was at the center of a controversy over unintended acceleration following a report on 60 Minutes. Later, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it wasn't able to find a problem that would produce sudden acceleration and brake failure in Audis, but that happened after the brand was almost killed off in the U.S.

"We sold 75,000 units before and only a couple years after we went down to 12,000 units, so this was a dramatic impact on the brand," Keogh says.

Reinventing The Brand

After getting clobbered that hard, what else was there to do?

"Audi did a couple of things: They made ... enormous investment in the brand. When I say enormous, I mean hundreds of millions of dollars," says Rebecca Lindland, a senior analyst with IHS Automotive.

Lindland says the company focused in an intense way on the design of the cars to make sure they stood apart. It changed the look and the proportions of the vehicles — things that consumers may not understand, she says.

"You don't know why somebody's absolutely beautiful, but at the end of the day it comes to their bone structure. It's the same thing with cars. It's like the perfect cheekbones and the appropriate eyebrow formation, and everything kind of comes together," she says.

Those proportions not only have caught on with younger buyers in the U.S. but also with Chinese bureaucrats. Last year's Audi sales were up nearly 50 percent in China; comparatively, last month they went up 25 percent in the U.S. compared with October 2010.

"They provided people with a brand that not everybody sees all over the place, and then they did it with really cool headlamps," Lindland says with a laugh.

She says young consumers, especially luxury buyers, would rather stand out than blend in, but in an understated way.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.