Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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'Brilliant Minds' Behind 'Mary Tyler Moore'

May 26, 2013
Originally published on May 26, 2013 9:08 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural - think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than 35 years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong has written a new history of the show talking to the women behind the scenes, who were some of the first to break into the industry, about how the show made it to air, and beyond. It's called "Mary, and Lou, and Ted, and Rhoda" and she joined Rachel Martin, the host of Weekend Edition, to explain how the creators of The Mary Tyler Moore Show wanted her to be different than the women who were on TV at that time.


Interview Highlights

On writing a different kind of woman

"Originally they had intended for her to be divorced, because they felt like that was something that everyone was going through and talking about at the time. They did not get the divorced part through with CBS, but they did manage to have her be single and working ... [James L. Brooks and Alan Burns] brought in a lot of talented female writers, more than most shows had ever done before ... The first person they hired to write for the show was named Treva Silverman, and they loved her work. She became a very intrinsic part of the development of the show, and how the show took shape developed over the first several seasons."

On working in an office that didn't work for them

"One of the early and lone champions of the show at CBS was Ethel Winant. She was the only women in the sort of executive ranks, and so there was an executive bathroom, but there was only one ... So she would leave her high heels outside the door so that men knew she was in there, because there was no lock on the door either, of course."

On breaking ground, but staying safe

"They realized that their whole deal was to be very character driven, and if that meant at times, Lou gets a divorce, so be it, but that had to come from the character and they had to do it in a really realistic way. They ended up doing a lot of things like that. They had an episode with a gay character where Phyllis's brother turns out to be gay. They only did that, though, when they felt like it was the right thing for all of the characters."

On "Mary" echoed today

"I think we see it all over the place ... We've had this incredible spate of shows about single girls, lots of them very good, but yeah, you know, I think that a lot of the young women who are creating shows are affected by this show ... Combining the pathos and the funny is really a hallmark of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, so I think it is all over the place."

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