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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

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Boston's Heroes Seriously Inspire Ray From 'Car Talk'

Apr 18, 2013

Jokes weren't on his mind Thursday morning when Car Talk funny guy Ray Magliozzi was a guest on WBUR's On Point with Tom Ashbrook.

The Boston native's thoughts were focused on Monday's bombings at his city's marathon and in particular on the way emergency personnel, spectators, runners and others responded when the victims needed their help.

"There is a positive in all of this," Ray said. "The actions of those civilians on Monday can really inspire the rest of us to do something that we would otherwise run away from.

"It doesn't have to be something profound like running into a burning building, but I hope that some of us might gather the courage to do something that we think we're incapable of. It could be something as simple as starting to care for an aging loved one or repairing a relationship."

Ray also said that this year's attacks have inspired him to be sure to be at next year's Boston Marathon to cheer on runners.

His thoughts echo those of many who spoke at Thursday's interfaith service in Boston, where President Obama and others praised the acts of bravery and selflessness displayed by many at the scene of the bombings.

There's much more from Ray's conversation with On Point posted here.

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