Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Boston Bombing Suspect's Body Finally 'Entombed,' Police Say

May 9, 2013

The body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "is now entombed," the Worcester, Mass., police department announced Thursday morning.

The statement does not reveal where Tsarnaev's remains were taken, only that "as a result of our public appeal for help, a courageous and compassionate individual came forward to provide the assistance needed to properly bury the deceased. His body is no longer in the City of Worcester and is now entombed."

Tsarnaev died on April 19 following a gun battle with police. The twin bombings near the marathon's finish line, which killed three people and wounded more than 250, happened April 15. The other suspect in the bombings, Tsarnaev's brother Dzhokhar, was captured on the 19th.

As we've reported, Worcester funeral director Peter Stefan had been trying in vain for more than two weeks to find a cemetery or locality willing to take Tamerlan Tsarnaev's body. On Wednesday, Worcester police Chief Gary Gemme talked about the thousands of dollars it was costing his department to protect Stefan's funeral home and added these emotional words: "We are not barbarians, we bury the dead."

Related story: In Boston, A Rare Rejection Of The Dead.

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