Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

35 minutes ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Pages

Book News: Taliban Shooting Victim Is Publishing A Memoir: 'I Am Malala'

Mar 28, 2013
Originally published on March 28, 2013 8:25 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenage girl shot in the head by a Taliban gunman last fall for advocating girls' right to an education, plans to publish a memoir this fall titled, I Am Malala. "I want to tell my story, but it will also be the story of 61 million children who can't get education," she wrote in a press release. Reports put the deal around $3 million, but no one at publisher Little, Brown was willing to confirm the number.
  • Did you know that Sylvia Plath wrote a children's book?
  • Brandee Barker, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's spokesperson, allegedly told a critic of Sandberg's book, Lean In, "There's a special place in hell for you." Taylor Swift joke, hoax or nervous breakdown?
  • Nathan Englander, on needing coffee to write, in an interview with The Daily Beast: "I used to drink coffee Balzac-style, literally 90 gallons of coffee a day. I'm three years clean on decaf. I thought the muse was contained in the act of consuming enough caffeine until you were at the edge of psychosis — you know, until you're writing with the lights off because you also think you're hiding from the CIA."
  • Atlas Shrugged: Part III, is coming soon to a theatre near you. (Prompting the question — did anyone know that there were Atlas Shrugged: Parts I & II?)
  • The California Department of Education's new recommended reading list, released last week, has caused a stir because of a backlash against the handful of books featuring gay and transgender characters. In particular, comments from Sandy Rios, a radio show host and Fox News contributor, sparked outrage. Rios said, "The reading lists are very overtly propagating a point of view that is at odds with most American parents. Leftist educators are advocates of everything from socialism to sexual anarchy. It's very base; it's raping the innocence of our children."
Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.