Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Book News: Paula Deen's Cookbook Sales Still Sizzle

Jun 28, 2013
Originally published on June 28, 2013 7:48 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • Paula Deen's New Testament: 250 Favorite Recipes, All Lightened Up isn't even out yet (it's set to be published in October), but a surge of pre-orders in the past few days has made it the top-selling book on Amazon. The cookbook, which was at 1,580th place on Monday, jumped in the midst of the growing scandal surrounding her use of racial slurs. Although The Food Network, Target and other companies have ended their contracts with Deen, Random House has said only that it is "monitoring" the situation. Speaking of TV, NPR's Linda Holmes writes about why it isn't surprising that Deen's star at The Food Network has fallen.
  • Jamie Oliver, 38-year-old celebrity chef, cookbook author and possessor of awesome '90s boyband highlights, said that due to his dyslexia, he had never read an entire book until recently finishing Catching Fire, the sequel to Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games.
  • The Paris Review features a mean (but brilliant) rejection letter that publisher Arthur C. Fifield sent to Gertrude Stein in 1912, written in the style of her experimental writing: "Being only one, having only one pair of eyes, having only one time, having only one life, I cannot read your M.S. three or four times. Not even one time. Only one look, only one look is enough. Hardly one copy would sell here. Hardly one. Hardly one."
  • The HarperCollins imprint Ecco announced Thursday that it will publish The Joy Luck Club author Amy Tan's next two books, a collection of personal essays and a novel called The Memory of Desire. Tan wrote in a press release that the novel is "about a house in San Francisco and the battle for ownership among three families over the last seventy-five years. The narrator is an octogenarian who has had a stroke and finds she can speak only Chinese, the once-forgotten language of her childhood."
  • Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks to Fresh Air's Terry Gross about race in America and her new novel Americanah: "It's a strange thing, and it's complicated, but there's a certain privilege to not being African-American in certain circles in the U.S., being black but not African-American... I think that one isn't burdened by America's terrible racial history."
  • Dan Savage explains to The New York Times why he thinks it's OK to steal books from hotel lobbies: "I don't consider swiping a book that is being used as a decorative object to be theft. It's a rescue."
Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.