Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

57 minutes ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

4 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Book News: Lance Armstrong's Lies Are Protected, Judge Says

Sep 12, 2013

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • A federal judge has ruled that Lance Armstrong, the disgraced cyclist who admitted to doping earlier this year, is allowed to lie in his memoirs. Earlier this year, a group of readers in California sued Armstrong for fraud and false advertising, saying they would not have bought his books It's Not About The Bike and Every Second Counts had they known his claims about doping were false. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Morrison England issued a 39-page ruling in favor of Armstrong and his publishers that stated, "The content of the Armstrong books is not an advertisement for a product; rather, the statements are Armstrong's account, albeit partially untruthful, of his life and cycling career." It added that "the content of the books is afforded full First Amendment protection."
  • Annie Proulx wrote the libretto for a new opera based on her short story "Brokeback Mountain," which will premiere this winter at the Teatro Real in Madrid. The opera's composer, Charles Wuorinen, said in a statement, "When to my great joy Annie Proulx agreed to write the libretto herself for my proposed opera, I told her that my mission would be to restore the meaning of a story that may have become world famous, but (as happens so often) has been hidden in the process."
  • In an excerpt from her memoir, Jesmyn Ward writes about her brother, who was killed by a drunk driver: " 'You still want your oil changed?' my father asked. Years later, this ordinary memory gains heft, representative of all the ordinary days we shared, all the ordinary days we lost. It generates so much heat, it makes my fingers ache like a phantom limb as I imagine my brother alive and close enough to touch, how he would be warm on that cold day: the keloids of his scars, his scalp the color of butter."
  • In an interview with Amnesty International about the Sept. 11, 1973, military coup in Chile, author Isabel Allende recalls the funeral of Chilean poet Pablo Neruda: "That day we buried not only the poet, we buried [President Salvador] Allende, [folk singer Victor] Jara, and hundreds of other victims, we buried our democracy, and we buried freedom."
  • For The New Yorker, Reed Johnson explores why J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye is so popular in Russia: "For a postwar intelligentsia chafing under repressive Communist rule, Holden Caulfield's voice was electrifying — who knew phony better than these daily consumers of official Soviet language?"
Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.