Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

5 hours ago
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Book News: 'Fast And Furious' Whistle-Blower Will Be Allowed To Publish Account

Oct 18, 2013
Originally published on October 18, 2013 2:02 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives says it will allow Special Agent John Dodson, a whistle-blower who testified in front of Congress about the ATF's "Fast and Furious" firearms sting operation, to publish a book about it. The ATF originally kept the book from being published because, among other reasons, it might have "a negative impact on morale." But a recent letter from the ATF to the ACLU, which was obtained by Politico, says, "ATF does not object to the publication of Special Agent Dodson's book, once it has been scrubbed of any information that would be law enforcement sensitive or restricted from dissemination." It's still not clear whether Dodson will be allowed to profit from the book: The DOJ rules say, "A subject is prohibited from writing about issues that arise from his or her duties as a special agent and profiting from his or her experiences while still acting in the special agent capacity."

  • Penguin Classics published a memoir by the musician Morrissey, causing much grumbling, since it is an imprint usually reserved for Very Serious (dead) Authors. Penguin said the book sold 20,000 copies on its first day. Meanwhile, everyone is also frantically speculating over whether it does or does not say that Morrissey is gay.

  • Donna Tartt tells The New York Times her favorite things to read: "To paraphrase Nabokov: all I want from a book is the tingle down the spine, for my hairs to stand on end."

  • Eleanor Catton, who won the Man Booker Prize for her novel The Luminaries, writes about growing up in New Zealand: "Travel brochures try to capture the quality of New Zealand's panoramas with adjectives — "pristine", "untouched", "majestic." But the words seem cheap and insubstantial, however accurate they may be, in the face of the real thing. The language of description is always a matter of equivalence (a word equals the thing it describes) and so cannot contend with the sublime. But the language of paradox, oxymoron and subtle contradiction — the language of children — does better. Aotearoa is a land made perfect only by its opposites, the water and the air. It is both north and south at once. It is a land that casts its shadow on the clouds."

  • Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson gave a rare interview to Mental Floss. Asked why he is averse to sequels, he said, "Repetition is the death of magic."

  • Zadie Smith writes about her father and the gardens of Italy in a lovely essay for The New York Review of Books: "Harvey and I knew from experience that it takes a while for immigrants to believe a park is truly public and open to them: my mother always used to complain, exaggerating somewhat (and not without a little pride), that she was the only black woman to be seen pushing a stroller through St. James's Park in 1975. Sometimes a generation of habitation is needed to create the necessary confidence; to believe that this gate will open for you too. In Italy, where so many kinds of gates are closed to so many people, there is something especially beautiful in the freedom of a garden."
Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.