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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

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Bolo Tie Goes High-Brow At Arizona Art Exhibit

Dec 9, 2011
Originally published on December 9, 2011 7:42 pm

Arizona celebrates its centennial next year, and to help get folks spruced up for the occasion, the Heard Museum in Phoenix recently opened an exhibition featuring the state's official neckwear — the bolo tie.

The roots of the bolo tie aren't known for sure. But the story goes like this: Back in the 1930s and '40s, when Western swing was in full swing, a cowboy and silversmith in Wickenburg, Ariz., named Vic Cedarstaff was out riding his horse. The wind picked up, and to keep his silver hatband safe, Cedarstaff looped it around his neck.

"And a friend looked up and said, 'Nice tie you got there, Vic,' " says Norman Sandfield, one of the world's foremost bolo tie collectors. According to Sandfield, the Cedarstaff story may be true, but no one really knows if it was the first bolo tie.

"In the late 1940s, Navajo artists were making them in the Phoenix/Scottsdale area — very simple, small, maybe 1-inch-high slides with a braided cord," he says.

Those simple designs are alongside true works of art in a high-ceilinged gallery at the Heard Museum. Diana Pardue curated the show. Her favorite is a tie nearly 4 inches tall depicting a man and woman square-dancing.

"It's a Zuni bolo tie made in coral, white shell and jet, and I like it because it has a lot of movement, and it has a lot of character," Pardue says.

Many of the ties here came from Sandfield's collection. He is still buying bolo ties, though he passed on one from an auction at the Roy Rogers Museum inspired by Rogers' horse, Trigger.

"And it was Trigger's horse poop bolo tie. Poop. P-double-O-P," Sandfield says. "From fine jewelry to folksy pieces, they're made out of everything you can imagine. It's not all art."

A 1964 "Barry Goldwater for President" bolo is on display here, as are logos from football teams, military units and a tie in the shape of Arizona.

Singing cowboys may have first popularized the bolo tie, followed by rockabilly musicians in the 1950s who made them hip. Bolo ties have never really gone out of style. A large photograph on the gallery wall shows a line of runway models wearing them in a New York City fashion show last year. All they require is a shirt with a collar. The way you wear them, says Sandfield, depends on the occasion.

"The simple rule is: The more formal you are, the higher you wear it. With a tuxedo, you would definitely button your top button and push it all the way to the top of the collar," Sandfield says. "More casual, you have to open buttons and you wear it lower."

The show, officially titled "Native American Bolo Ties," is at the Heard Museum for the next year.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. The state of Arizona celebrates its centennial next year, and to help people get dressed up for the occasion, the Heard Museum in Phoenix recently opened an exhibition. It features the state's official neckwear. Yes, Arizona has official neckwear: the bolo tie. NPR's Ted Robbins takes us to the museum.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TED ROBBINS, BYLINE: Back when Western swing was in full swing, a cowboy and silversmith in Wickenburg, Arizona, named Vic Cedarstaff was out riding his horse. As the story goes, the wind picked up, and to keep his silver hatband safe, Cedarstaff looped it around his neck.

NORMAN SANDFIELD: And a friend looked up and said: Nice tie you got there, Vic.

ROBBINS: Norman Sandfield is one of the world's foremost bolo tie collectors. He says the Cedarstaff story may be true, but no one really knows if it was the first bolo tie.

SANDFIELD: In the late '40s, Navajo artists were making them in the Phoenix-Scottsdale area: very simple, small, maybe 1-inch-high slides with a braided cord.

ROBBINS: Those simple designs are alongside true works of art in a high-ceilinged gallery at the Heard Museum: silver, gold, turquoise, coral, onyx, stones surrounded by Hopi silver overlay; shapes from nature and abstract designs. Diana Pardue curated the show. Her favorite: a tie nearly 4 inches tall depicting a man and woman square-dancing.

DIANA PARDUE: It's a Zuni bolo tie made in coral, white shell and jet, and I like it because it has a lot of movement and it has a lot of character.

ROBBINS: Many of the ties here came from Norman Sandfield's collection. He is still buying bolo ties, though he passed on one from an auction at the Roy Rogers Museum inspired by Roger's horse Trigger.

SANDFIELD: And it was Trigger's horse poop bolo tie. Poop, P-double O-P. From fine jewelry to folksy pieces, they're made out of everything you can imagine. It's not all art.

ROBBINS: A 1964 Barry Goldwater for president bolo is on display here. Logos from football teams, military units and a tie in the shape of Arizona.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HOME ON THE RANGE")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam, where the deer and the antelope play...

ROBBINS: Singing cowboys may have first popularized the bolo tie, followed by rockabilly musicians in the '50s, who made them hip.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

ROBBINS: Bolo ties have never really gone out of style. A large photograph on the gallery wall shows a line of runway models wearing them in a New York fashion show last year. All they require is a shirt with a collar. The way you wear them, says Norman Sandfield, depends on the occasion.

SANDFIELD: The simple rule is the more formal you are, the higher you wear it. With a tuxedo, you would definitely button your top button and push it all the way to the top of the collar. More casual, you have open buttons, and you wear it lower.

ROBBINS: The show is officially titled "Native American Bolo Ties." It's at the Heard Museum in Phoenix for the next year. Ted Robbins, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.