Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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A 'Big Picture' Intently Focused On The Details

Oct 11, 2012

The original French title of The Big Picture — an adaptation of a novel by American expatriate writer Douglas Kennedy — means "the man who wanted to live his life." That's pointedly ironic, since this existential thriller is about a person who seeks personal freedom by becoming somebody else.

Aside from the crying baby who wakes him in the opening scene, Paul (Romain Duris) seems to have an enviable life. The junior partner in a successful Paris law firm, Paul looks like a movie star — perpetually unshaven, with a mop of black hair and the pantherlike presence of Duris, France's most feral film actor. His wife, Sarah (Marina Fois), is smart and beautiful, and his two young sons are cute.

But Sarah thinks that Paul neglects her and has undermined her dream of becoming a writer. There are hints that she's having an affair. It's not a good time for Paul's mentor (Catherine Deneuve, in a cameo) to announce that she'll be gone soon and is leaving the firm to him.

Paul doesn't want it. What he wanted, and still does, was to be a photographer. It galls him that his longtime neighbor, Greg (Eric Ruf), has pursued that career, even if he's not very successful at it. Paul's annoyance with Greg increases when he notices that the guy shares certain small intimacies with Sarah.

Paul confronts Greg, and in the scuffle the latter accidentally dies. Although there's no suggestion that Paul has ever practiced criminal law, he turns out to be something of an expert at disposing of bodies and switching identities. Within a few days, Paul has convinced everyone that he's dead, and that Greg has gone on assignment to Eastern Europe.

Using Greg's name and a new phony passport, Paul settles in shabbily scenic Montenegro. He begins taking pictures of local workers, which are spotted by the French expat editor (Niels Arestrup) of a local newspaper. Soon, Paul/Greg has become the celebrated photographer that both once yearned to be. But his sudden success could blow his cover.

Kennedy's The Big Picture was published in 1997, when there wasn't as much personal information flowing across the Internet. The movie is set in more recent times and acknowledges the existence of search engines. But director and co-writer Eric Lartigau is more interested in Paul's state of mind than in the practical aspects of stealing another person's identity.

The director does methodically depict the mechanics of some of Paul's actions, whether he's working in his darkroom or disposing of Greg's body. But the primary purpose of such sequences is to convey his protagonist's obsessiveness. Once Paul decides on a course of action, he never abandons it — even when it seemingly leads only to oblivion.

Although it includes a few tense moments, the movie is not primarily a thriller. The final scene will disappoint anyone expecting a major blowup or meltdown; it's simply a small irony, turning on a marginal character's moment of identity swapping.

The Big Picture has been compared to The Talented Mr. Ripley, the twice-filmed Patricia Highsmith novel about a sociopath who kills and then impersonates a rich acquaintance. But in spirit it's closer to Michelangelo Antonioni's 1975 The Passenger, with Jack Nicholson as an existential adventurer who poses as a dead stranger.

Toward the movie's end, the mood becomes increasingly nightmarish, culminating in a violent scene aboard a ship on the Adriatic. The sheer intensity of such moments is a large part of what makes The Big Picture powerful. But even when Paul is in physical danger, his greatest struggles are internal.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.