Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Best Books For Kids Age 9-14? You Tell Us

Jun 25, 2013
Originally published on July 1, 2013 10:56 am

Nominations are now closed, but check back in a few weeks to see the titles that made it onto NPR's Ultimate Kids' Bookself.

Ever since we launched NPR's Backseat Book Club in 2011, our young listeners have been busy reading — classics like The Wizard of Oz, Black Beauty and The Phantom Tollbooth, and newer tales, like The Graveyard Book, The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Lunch Lady graphic novels. (Here's a list of all the books we've read so far.) This summer, with your help, NPR Books will assemble the Ultimate Kids' Bookshelf — a collection of 100 books that every 9- to 14-year-old should read.

To nominate your favorite books for consideration, log in below and write the titles and authors into the comments field. Based on your recommendations, our expert panel — made up of children's book authors and bloggers and librarians — will curate the final list of 100 books. Before you start nominating, here are a few guidelines:

1. Limit yourself to five titles per post. Don't hesitate to nominate a book that someone else has already listed. We'll tally your nominations and take note of the most popular titles.

2. Not too old and not too young. Remember, the age range we are targeting here is 9-14. (If you are looking for YA books, you can check out our audience poll from last summer.)

3. Feel free to nominate a series. The Diary of a Wimpy Kid series or the Harry Potter series, for example, will be considered as single, collective works — so don't bother listing the separate titles in the series. To qualify as a collective work, the books in a series must be written by the same originating author or authors, and must tell a more or less continuous story — usually about a consistent group of characters. If it's a very large series — such as Goosebumps or the Nancy Drew books — feel free to nominate your favorite title as an individual work.

Which books did you love when you were this age? Which books do your kids love today? We'll publish our 100-title bookshelf later this summer. For now, send us your lists!

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, a couple of notes about summer reading, first, NPR's Backseat Book Club. Our pick this month is a novel called "Glory Be" by Augusta Scattergood. It's set in 1969 in Hanging Moss, Mississippi. It's the story of Glory, a girl who loves to read "Nancy Drew" and can sense that her town is on the verge of changing forever. You can send your questions for the author. Email us at backseatbookclub@npr.org. Or send a tweet, we're @nprbackseat.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We also need your help with a new project. NPR Books is building the Ultimate Kids Bookshelf, a list of 100 titles that every 9-to-14-year-old should read. So, what books did you love at that age? What books do your kids love now? Make your nominations at NPR.org

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SIEGEL: This is NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.