New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Is This The Beginning Of Obama Unbound?

Aug 23, 2013

Are we seeing the beginning of a trend from the occupant of the Oval Office — a President Obama unbound?

That's the question after Obama cast aside his usual caution while speaking at a town hall-style meeting in Binghamton, N.Y., on Friday. Asked about his proposals for attacking soaring higher education costs, Obama said:

"This is probably controversial to say, but what the heck. I'm in my second term, so I can say it. [Audience laughter.] You know, I believe, for example, that law schools would probably be wise to think about being two years instead of three years because by the third year — in the first two years, young people are learning in the classroom. The third year they'd be better off clerking or practicing in a firm, even if they weren't getting paid that much."

The president, a former University of Chicago law school lecturer, was injecting some levity into what is, yes, a controversial topic. The issue of two- versus three-year programs is at the center of a hot debate in legal education circles.

But his humor had a basis in truth. And it's true that as a president who no longer has to worry about re-election, the habitually cautious Obama is freer to wade into controversies he might have avoided in his first term.

Some observers certainly believed that's what they saw earlier this summer after George Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges in the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

Maybe the president would have spoken as unequivocally as an African-American if the verdict had come before Election Day. But some who heard him were sure he spoke the way he did because re-election worries were behind him.

Of course, the president himself signaled last year that he would be freer to act after his re-election.

It wasn't a signal meant for public consumption, but remember when Obama told then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev that he would have "more flexibility" after his re-election?

Being unbound may not make it any more likely that he gets his legislative proposals through the GOP-led House. But he could kick-start a few interesting national discussions, if nothing else.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.