Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Bears Stuffing Themselves Near Massachusetts Homes

Apr 6, 2012
Originally published on April 6, 2012 7:33 pm

The mild New England winter means that more bears are up and about, looking for food — and not just in the woods. They're also exploring urban backyards and residential streets. The small town of Northampton, Mass., has more than its share of furry visitors.

In Northampton, a call on a neighborhood email list for tales of recent bear encounters netted about about a dozen responses in an hour. Almost everyone, it seems, has a bear story.

"I was weeding by the side of our driveway, middle of a summer day, and a huge — must've been a male — literally walked by within a couple feet of me," one neighbor says.

"And I screamed at Joan, 'There's a bear!' really loud, but of course, she couldn't hear me because she's, you know, bopping away under the headphones," recounts another.

"I walked out on the porch, and there was a bear with two cubs," a third neighbor says.

How did Northampton get to this point? It's a college town full of restaurants, clothing stores and art galleries. Not exactly wilderness.

But it's flanked by rural, wooded and swampy areas that black bears love — and they don't have far to go for easy meals. They eat from the Dumpsters, the bird feeders and the compost bins.

"And the mother bear lifted this up and swung the door open, and knocked the trash can over. And I mean, we see them in the yard all the time," a resident explains.

Over the past three decades, wildlife trackers have counted more and more bears in Northampton. Jane Fleishman, who lives near a meadow, says it's not unusual for her to look up from cooking dinner and see a mama bear and her cubs lumbering down the cul-de-sac.

"When the bears are sighted in our neighborhood, you can literally track them on the Internet," Fleishman says. "People will post a photo, and then 10 minutes later they'll say, 'Oh, it's in my driveway,' 'Oh, it's in my backyard,' and you can literally follow them around. And so in some ways, I think there's a great fascination for them."

People don't seem to be scared. There are reports of bears breaking into cars or popping out kitchen screens, but no attacks on humans. Northampton writer Elissa Alford even tried to talk to a bear on her patio.

"I really just wanted to make eye contact," Alford says. "I wanted to have that moment where we were together and seeing each other. That contact with the wild."

But does it have to be quite so close?

"We love bears. We love wildlife. What we don't love is having them trample through our property on a daily basis," says resident Janel Jorda.

Jorda sees a darker side to the Northampton ursine story. Bears have destroyed her wooden trash enclosure and crushed her landscape lighting. Last month, a mother bear ripped down her chain link fence as Jorda gaped from the other side of a glass door.

"When the baby tried to follow the mother in, the baby got stuck," Jorda says. "The baby was huge, and got stuck inside the fence, and that's when I was like, 'Oh man, I'd better call the police.' Because I was alone with a huge mother and two babies."

Jorda doesn't blame the bears — she blames a neighbor who's apparently feeding them.

Wildlife officials are pushing for a city law to make feeding bears illegal, so they'd have little reason to leave their natural habitat. The problem is, mother bears have already taught their cubs that chomping on discarded pizza crusts is a lot easier than picking berries in the woods. For the next generation of bears, this may actually be their natural habitat.

Copyright 2013 WFCR-FM. To see more, visit http://www.nepr.net/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's how you know it's spring time in New England: The days are growing longer, the trees are budding and bears are invading. In many towns in western Massachusetts, black bears are exploring urban backyards and residential streets on a hunt for food in what's becoming an annual rite of spring. Karen Brown of New England Public Radio has this report.

KAREN BROWN, BYLINE: I've put out the word on my neighborhood listserv that I was looking for tales of recent bear encounters. Within an hour, I had about a dozen responses. That's twice as many as when I asked for gutter cleaners. Almost everyone, it seems, has a bear story.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: I was weeding by the side of our driveway, middle of a summer day, and a huge, must've been a male, literally walked by within a couple feet of me.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: And I just screamed at Joan, there's a bear, really loud. And, of course, she couldn't hear me because she's like, you know, bopping away under the headphones.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #3: Walked out on the porch, and there was a bear with two cubs...

BROWN: How did we get to this point? Northampton is a college town, full of restaurants, clothing stores and art galleries - not exactly wilderness. But it's flanked by rural, wooded and swampy areas that black bears love, and they don't have far to go for easy meals - our dumpsters, our bird feeders, our compost bins.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #4: And the mother bear lifted this up and swung the door open, and knocked the trash can over. And, you know, I mean, we see them in the yard all the time.

BROWN: Over the last three decades, wildlife trackers have counted more and more bears in Northampton. I live near a meadow, and it's not unusual to look up from cooking dinner and see a mama bear and her cubs lumbering down the cul-de-sac, as my neighbor Jane Fleishman explains.

JANE FLEISHMAN: When the bears are sighted in our neighborhood, you can literally track them on the Internet. People will post a photo, and then 10 minutes later, they'll say, oh, it's in my driveway. Oh, it's in my backyard. And you can literally follow them around. So in some ways, I think there's a great fascination for them.

BROWN: People don't seem to be scared. There are reports of bears breaking into cars or popping out kitchen screens, but no attacks on humans. Northampton writer Elissa Alford even tried to talk to a bear on her patio.

ELISSA ALFORD: I really just wanted to make eye contact. I wanted to have that moment where we were together and seeing each other, that contact with the wild.

BROWN: But does it have to be quite so close?

JANEL JORDA: We love bears. We love wildlife. What we don't love is having them trample through our property on a daily basis.

BROWN: Janel Jorda sees a darker side to the Northampton ursine story. She shows me where bears have destroyed her wooden trash enclosure and crushed her landscape lighting. Last month, a mother bear ripped down her chain link fence as Jorda gaped from the other side of a glass door.

JORDA: When the baby tried to follow the mother in, the baby got stuck - and the baby was huge - and got stuck inside the fence. And that's when I was, like, oh, man, I better call the police, because I was alone with a huge mother and two babies.

BROWN: Jorda doesn't blame the bears. She blames a neighbor who's apparently feeding them. Wildlife officials are pushing for a city law to make feeding bears illegal, so they'd have little reason to leave their natural habitat. Problem is, mother bears have already taught their cubs that chomping on discarded pizza crusts is a lot easier than picking berries in the woods. For the next generation of bears, this may actually be their natural habitat.

For NPR News, I'm Karen Brown in Northampton, Massachusetts. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.