Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

30 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Backyard Chickens: Cute, Trendy Spreaders Of Salmonella

Mar 24, 2013

Backyard chickens have become a coveted suburban accessory, one that packages cuteness, convenience and local food production in one fluffy feathered package.

But animal husbandry can be a nasty business, a fact that's often glossed over by poultry partisans like Martha Stewart and New Yorker writer Susan Orlean.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report doesn't do gloss. In its latest edition, this chronicle of all things contagious reports on a 2012 salmonella outbreak among 195 people in 27 states.

Most had had contact with live chickens, and many had purchased the birds from an Ohio mail-order hatchery for backyard flocks.

"This outbreak investigation identified the largest number of human illnesses ever linked to contact with live poultry during a single outbreak," the MMWR report concludes, "and it underscores the ongoing risk for human salmonellosis linked to backyard flocks."

The hatchery that was the source of the birds participated in a program to eliminate the spread of salmonella strains that cause illness in birds, but doesn't certify the poultry as free of strains that could infect people.

But it's no surprise to anybody in the zoonotic disease world that chickens can spread human disease. Remember those warnings not to buy baby chicks for Easter presents? One big reason is that they can spread salmonella.

Humans can get salmonella from chickens by touching them or their manure, according to the CDC. The birds can spread the bacteria even when they look healthy. The agency says the best way to reduce risk is to wash hands after handling birds — and make sure that children wash their hands, too.

Public health officials are also worried about backyard flocks and bird flu. The USDA provides tips on how to keep domestic fowl from playing a role in a future global pandemic, with no less than backyard poultry expert Andy Schneider, aka The Chicken Whisperer, as their spokesperson.

Buying eggs from the supermarket is a relatively recent invention, as Orlean has pointed out. So maybe the return of backyard chickens is a return to normal. And that's normal, germs included.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.