Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Atomic Energy Chief: Iran Hasn't Resolved Questions

Mar 5, 2012
Originally published on March 5, 2012 6:18 pm

The troubled relationship between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency doesn't appear to be getting any better.

Back in February, senior agency delegations traveled twice to Iran to clarify its concerns about possible nuclear weapons work.

And on Monday, the head of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, said Iran is not providing the necessary cooperation that would allow the agency to give credible assurances that Iran's nuclear work is entirely peaceful.

"The agency continues to have serious concerns regarding possible military dimensions to Iran's nuclear program," Amano said in Vienna, where he was meeting with the agency's board of governors. "I had hoped to be able to inform this board that substantive progress had been made. However, despite intensive discussions, there was no agreement on a structured approach to resolve these issues."

Monday's developments in Vienna came as President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met at the White House to discuss Iran's nuclear ambitions.

Israel says time is running out to act against Iran before it develops a nuclear bomb. The United States, while also expressing serious concerns about the Iranian nuclear program, says it believes that sanctions against Iran should be given more time. President Obama stressed that the U.S. was determined to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

"The United States will always have Israel's back when it comes to Israel's security," Obama told Netanyahu.

Meanwhile, Iran's leaders insist the nuclear program has no military dimensions.

IAEA Wants More Information

The IAEA's list of the concerns about Iran is well known: the possible production of neutron initiators and other triggers for a nuclear explosion; and suspected work on shaping uranium metal, a possible component of a bomb's core.

The agency's analysts are especially concerned about tests that may have taken place at a military base at Parchin, just southeast of the capital Tehran. On two recent occasions, the IAEA asked to visit Parchin. Both times it was rebuffed.

"We are aware that there are some activities at Parchin, and it makes us believe that going there sooner is better than later," Amano said.

His agency has information — in part based on satellite photos — that Iranian authorities may have removed evidence of explosive tests at the Parchin site.

In recent reports, the agency said it believed Iran engaged in a full-scale nuclear weapons program until 2003, when the project came to a halt.

But the agency says it has credible evidence that work on aspects of nuclear weapons technology may have continued after 2003, and that some of that work may be taking place today.

Hardliners Dominate Iranian Elections

Despite all the talk internationally about Iran's nuclear activities, the big news topic in Iran is the parliamentary election that was held Friday.

Several thousand candidates vied for 290 seats in the parliament. Almost all were conservatives of one stripe or another. Reformists were either banned or boycotted the vote.

For some, the election was seen as part of an ongoing contest for power between the country's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

But Iran's news media are reporting that it was hardly a contest. Supporters of Khamenei are said to have soundly defeated partisans of Ahmadinejad. Local news media quoting the interior ministry saying 75 percent of the Khamenei candidates won seats.

Over the weekend, the Interior Minister announced that turnout was a relatively high 64 percent. But some critics of the regime have questioned the figure, suspecting the actual turnout was much lower.

The hostility toward Ahmadinejad among conservatives runs so deep now that the current parliament ordered him to appear soon to answer questions about his administration, a possible first step to impeachment.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Today, while the topic of Iran occupied Washington, it was also discussed at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. The agency's head, Yukiya Amano, said he cannot assure the world that Iran's nuclear activities are entirely peaceful.

NPR's Mike Shuster tells us more.

MIKE SHUSTER, BYLINE: The International Atomic Energy Agency has used tough language recently to describe its troubled relationship with Iran. In February, senior agency delegations traveled twice to Iran to clarify its concerns about possible nuclear weapons work. Today, Yukiya Amano, the agency's director, said Iran is not providing the necessary cooperation, so the IAEA can't provide credible assurance that Iran's nuclear work is entirely peaceful.

DR. YUKIYA AMANO: The agency continues to have serious concerns regarding possible military dimensions to Iran's nuclear program. I had hoped to be able to inform this board that substantive progress had been made. However, despite intensive discussions, there is no agreement on a structured approach to resolve these issues.

SHUSTER: The list of the agency's concerns is well-known; possible production of neutron initiators and other triggers for a nuclear explosion; also suspected work on shaping uranium metal, a possible component of a bomb's core. The agency's analysts are especially concerned about high explosives tests that may have taken place at a military base at Parchin.

Parchin is a priority for us, Amano said. Twice recently the agency asked to visit Parchin. Twice it was rebuffed.

AMANO: We are aware that there are some activities at Parchin, and it makes us believe that going there sooner is better than later.

SHUSTER: The IAEA has information in part based on satellite photos that the authorities may have removed evidence of explosive tests at the Parchin site. In recent reports, the IAEA said it believed Iran engaged in a full-scale nuclear weapons program until 2003, when it came to a halt. However, the agency says it has credible evidence that work on aspects of nuclear weapons technology may have continued after 2003, some of which may be underway today.

Iran's leaders insist the nuclear program has no military dimension.

Despite all the talk internationally about Iran's nuclear activities, the big news topic in Iran today was Friday's parliamentary election. Several thousand candidates vied for 290 seats in the parliament. Almost all were conservatives of one stripe or another. Reformists were either banned or boycotted.

For some the election was seen as a contest for power between President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. But Iran's news media are reporting it was hardly a contest. Supporters of Khamenei were said to have soundly defeated partisans of Ahmadinejad. Local news media quoting the Ministry of the Interior said 75 percent of the Khamenei candidates won seats.

Over the weekend, the interior minister announced that the turnout was 64 percent, an epic election some hardliners proclaimed. Some critics of the regime call it an invented election. The hostility toward Ahmadinejad among conservatives runs so deep now that the current parliament ordered him to appear soon to answer questions about his administration, a possible first step to impeachment.

Mike Shuster, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.