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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asiana Decides Not To Sue San Francisco TV Station

Jul 17, 2013
Originally published on July 25, 2013 12:34 pm

Asiana Airlines has decided not sue the Oakland television station that aired the bogus names of the flight crew piloting Flight 214, a Boeing 777 that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport earlier this month.

As we reported on Monday, the airline said it would sue the station because it damaged its reputation by inadvertently airing offensive names.

CNN reports:

"The company said Wednesday it wouldn't file a suit after KTVU offered an official apology. The bogus names, which phonetically spelled out phrases such as "Something Wrong" and "We Too Low," were read during KTVU's noon broadcast Friday. The airline called the report 'demeaning' and said it was 'reviewing possible legal action.'"

In related news, the AP reports that a Chicago law firm said it is suing Boeing on behalf of 83 people who were on the flight.

The AP reports the suit alleges a malfunctioning auto-throttle may have caused the crash. The AP adds:

"Ribbeck Law Chartered on Monday filed a petition for discovery, which is meant to preserve evidence, in Cook County Circuit Court in Chicago, where the aircraft manufacturer is headquartered. The firm said in a news release that additional pleadings will be filed against Asiana Airlines and several component parts manufacturers in coming days.

"In addition to potential problems with the Boeing 777's auto throttle, some emergency slides reportedly opened inside the plane, injuring passengers and blocking their exit, and some passengers had to be cut out of their seatbelts with a knife, the firm contends."

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