Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

Pages

Asia In Focus As U.S Expands Australia Defense Ties

Nov 17, 2011
Originally published on November 17, 2011 12:40 pm

President Obama traveled early Thursday to the Australian city of Darwin, a base for past U.S.-Australian military cooperation. Now it will be one of several military bases from which the U.S. operates as it seeks to reassert itself in Asia.

Some 250 U.S. Marines will arrive in northern Australia next year, a number that will later expand to about 2,500. U.S. jets and warships will also train with the Australians.

Abraham Denmark, a China specialist at the Center for Naval Analyses, sees the new focus on Asia as a natural evolution of U.S. interests.

"It has half of the world's population, three of the world's largest economies, it represents one-third of world trade, and it has several of the world's largest militaries, including some potential adversaries," Denmark says. "So it's very important for the United States to be there."

A Repositioning

The decision to increase military cooperation with Australia has been in the works for several years. It's part of a broader strategy calling for more diplomatic and economic cooperation with the region, a repositioning of U.S. troops based in northern Asia, and a downgrade of forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Patrick Cronin, a senior Asian analyst with the Center for a New American Security, says placing military assets in Australia was also a response to concerns by U.S. allies in Asia.

"The region was watching the United States over this last decade get deeper and deeper into this so-called war on terrorism and involved in counterinsurgencies and said, 'Don't you understand that this region is changing daily?' " Cronin says. "China's military modernization is affecting everybody's calculations."

The buildup of China's modern military forces has been paid for by its economic success. Denmark, with the Center for Naval Analyses, says China has the right to invest in its military, but its neighbors — and the U.S. — have grown concerned about Chinese efforts to deny access to critical commercial waterways.

Denmark says the South China Sea has become a "focal point."

"In recent years, China has acted very assertively in the South China Sea and started harassing American ships and other country's ships," he says.

'It Is Just Prudent'

The announcement about increased military cooperation with Australia comes the same week as the U.S. and other Asian nations negotiate a new free-trade deal, which for now does not include China. That, along with a push to renew ties with Asian allies, has raised questions about whether the U.S. is trying to "contain" China.

Geoffrey Garrett, the head of the United States Studies Center at the University of Sydney, says that isn't the case. He says there's a belief that China's rise will continue to be benign.

But, Garrett says, "it is just prudent for us to ensure against the small possibility that China's rise will turn from being benign to being more malign."

Cronin, with the Center for a New American Security, says the decision to base Marines in Australia will help reassure allies that the U.S. is going to be a long-term and important player in Asia. He says it's possible there will be similar agreements with other Asian nations in the future, noting a plan for the U.S. to station two small combat ships in Singapore.

"That could be replicated elsewhere, and people are thinking about the Philippines, people are thinking what could be done with Vietnam," he says. "Those kinds of cooperative arrangements are much more likely to be 'red lines' with China than anything the U.S. does with Australia."

Yet a Chinese spokesman expressed concern, saying the newly sealed military agreement between the U.S. and Australia "might not be appropriate and deserved greater scrutiny."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. Steve Inskeep is visiting member station WABE in Atlanta today.

President Obama was in the Australian city of Darwin this morning. Then he flew off to the Indonesia island of Bali for an East Asian summit. Darwin will be a new center of military operations in Asia for the U.S. It's all part of an agreement to increase military cooperation between the two countries - the U.S. and Australia. But as NPR's Jackie Northam reports, the move also reflects concerns about countering the growing power of China.

JACKIE NORTHAM, BYLINE: The city of Darwin has been a base for U.S. and Australian military cooperation before. Their joint forces came under constant attack there by Japanese bombers during World War II. Now it will be one of several military bases from which the U.S. operates as it seeks to reassert itself in Asia.

Some 250 U.S. Marines will arrive in northern Australia next year. That number will later expand to about 2,500. U.S. jets and warships will also train with the Australians.

Abraham Denmark, a China specialist at the Center for Naval Analysis, sees the new focus on Asia is a natural evolution of American interests.

ABRAHAM DENMARK: It has half of the world's population, three of the world's largest economies, it represents a third of world trade and has several of the world's largest militaries, including some potential adversaries. So it's very important for the United States to be there.

NORTHAM: The decision to increase military cooperation with Australia has been in the works for several years. It's part of a broader strategy calling for more diplomatic and economic cooperation with the region, a repositioning of American troops based in North Asia and a downgrade of forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Patrick Cronin, with the Center for a New American Security, says placing military assets in Australia was a response to concerns by U.S. allies in Asia.

PATRICK CRONIN: The region was watching the United States over this last decade, get deeper and deeper into this so-called war on terrorism and involved in counter insurgencies, and said don't you understand that this region is changing daily. China's military modernization is affecting everybody's calculations.

NORTHAM: The buildup of China's modern military force has been paid for its economic success. Abraham Denmark says China has the right to invest in its military, but its neighbors - and the U.S. - have grown concerned about Chinese efforts to deny access to critical commercial waterways.

DENMARK: And the South China Sea has become a focal point for these things. In recent years, China has acted very assertively in the South China Sea and started harassing American ships, harassing other country's ships.

NORTHAM: The announcement about increased military cooperation with Australia comes the same week as the U.S. and several Asian nations negotiate a new free-trade deal, which for now, does not include China. That, along with a push to renew ties with Asian allies, has raised questions whether the U.S. is trying to contain China.

Geoffrey Garret, the head of the United States Study Center at the University of Sydney, says that isn't the case. Garret recently told a panel that it's a matter of caution.

GEOFFREY GARRETT: While we believe that China's rise will continue to be benign and good for everybody, it is just prudent for us to ensure against the small possibility that China's rise will turn from being benign to being more malign.

NORTHAM: Patrick Cronin says the decision to base Marines in Australia will help reassure allies that the U.S. is going to be a long-term and important player in Asia. Cronin says it's possible there will be similar agreements with other Asian nations in the future. He points to a plan for the U.S. to station two small combat ships in Singapore.

CRONIN: That could be replicated elsewhere and people are thinking about the Philippines, people are thinking about what could be done with Vietnam. Now, those kinds of cooperative arrangements are much more likely to be red-lines with China than anything we do with Australia.

NORTHAM: But a Chinese spokesman expressed concern, saying the newly sealed military agreement between the U.S. and Australia might not be appropriate and deserved greater scrutiny.

Jackie Northam, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.