NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Pages

Army Aims To Use Words, Not Weapons, With Afghans

Sep 10, 2012
Originally published on September 10, 2012 6:53 pm

The U.S. Army has been ramping up instruction in the languages of Afghanistan, even as troop levels in the country decrease in preparation for the U.S. troop withdrawal in 2014.

This year, key installations have added several hundred speakers of Pashto and Dari to their ranks, more than doubling the number of soldiers trained in the Afghan languages.

But it's not just the country's languages that are foreign to U.S. soldiers — it's the culture, as well.

On a recent day at Fort Campbell, which straddles the Tennessee and Kentucky state line, smiling men in long shirts and baggy pants spin in circles, following the leader on a small stage. It's an ancient attan dance, and important for soldiers to see, says Ahmad Dauodzai, a native of Afghanistan.

In modern renditions of the dance, rocket launchers are sometimes fired into the air. But, Dauodzai says, soldiers need not be afraid. "It's not a sign of war or hatred. It's a sign of love, reconciliation," he says.

Daoudzai and dozens of other Afghan natives have been hired as trainers for this immersion program, also being offered at Fort Carson in Colorado and at New York's Fort Drum.

The first few weeks of the course are spent learning the more than 40 letters in Pashto, one of Afghanistan's two official languages.

U.S. Army Pfc. Timothy Griffin has advanced beyond the basics and is now studying how to connect with Afghan people. The conversation style sounds a lot like that of the American South.

"You're constantly asking them how they're doing, how their family's doing, how their neighbor's doing, " Griffin says. "Just anything, [like], 'How's your car?' Ten minutes later, you get to the main point, which is 30 seconds long. That's a conversation."

Early in the war, this level of cultural immersion was largely left to the Army's elite Special Forces, who shouldered the task of training indigenous forces.

But in 2010, the military's top brass issued a directive that at least one American per platoon should be able to go beyond "hello" and "thank you."

And as training the Afghan troops has become an important component of the U.S. exit strategy, training Afghan forces — and the cultural understanding that requires — has become the job of 19-year-old privates as well, says Maj. Gen. James McConville of the 101st Airborne Division.

McConville himself has been learning Dari, the language of Afghan government.

"This will be my second time going back to Afghanistan," he says. "You start to realize, I would have been much more effective if I understood the language and understood the culture, and maybe some of the things that may offend them that may lead to some situations that are not in the best interest of either of our forces."

Last month, 12 U.S. troops were killed by forces dressed in Afghan uniform. The Pentagon believes the bloodshed is often a result of personal grievances and what it calls "social difficulties." Language training is hardly a direct response to the killings, but McConville acknowledges that it may help.

Pfc. Maxwell Murphy says spending so much time with his Afghan instructors is at least a start to helping bridge those tensions. "I'm sure that a lot of my comrades don't believe that they can trust [the Afghans]," Murphy says. "I mean, I don't totally believe that I can trust them all the time, too."

Once he's deployed, Murphy figures that if a uniformed Afghan does go rogue, he'll be tipped off before anyone else. U.S. soldiers, he says, aren't expected to know the language — meaning he may have an edge when Afghans speak with one another in their native language.

"You may pick up them saying things that they don't think that you'll know. So hopefully — maybe — we can catch some stuff before something happens," Murphy says.

Whether potential threats are coming from inside or outside a unit, military commanders are hoping soldiers like Murphy find a way to occasionally use their words instead of their weapons.

Copyright 2013 Nashville Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wpln.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Even as the U.S. reduces troop levels in Afghanistan, the Army has been ramping up instruction in that country's languages. This year, some U.S. Army bases have added several hundred soldiers trained in Pashto and Dari. Blake Farmer of member station WPLN has the story from Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

BLAKE FARMER, BYLINE: It's more than the language that's foreign to soldiers, so is Afghanistan's culture.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

FARMER: Smiling men in long shirts and baggy pants follow the leader on a small stage, spinning in circles. It's an ancient attan dance, and important for soldiers to see, says Ahmad Dauodzai. In modern renditions, occasionally, rocket launchers are fired into the air, but he says soldiers need not be afraid.

AHMAD DAUODZAI: It's not a sign of war or hatred. You know, it's a sign of love, reconciliation.

FARMER: Dauodzai and dozens of other Afghan natives have been hired as trainers in this immersion program, replicated at Fort Carson, Colorado, and Fort Drum, New York. The first few weeks are spent in a book, learning the more than 40 letters in Pashto, one of two official languages in Afghanistan.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS TIMOTHY GRIFFIN: (Foreign language spoken)

FARMER: U.S. Army Private 1st Class Timothy Griffin has advanced beyond the basics and is now studying how to connect. The cadence of conversation sounds a lot like the American South.

GRIFFIN: You're constantly asking them how they're doing, how their family is doing, how their neighbors are doing, just anything, how's your car. Ten minutes later, then you get to the main point, which is, like, 30 seconds long. That's the conversation.

FARMER: Such cultural immersion was largely left to the Army's elite Special Forces who shouldered the task of training indigenous forces. But in Afghanistan, that's become the job of 19-year-old privates too. And the U.S. exit strategy calls for the mission to become even more about training the Afghan troops. So in 2010, the military's top brass issued a directive that at least one American per platoon should be able to go beyond hello and thank you. The 101st Airborne Division's commander hit the books too. Major General James McConville has been learning the language of Afghan government, Dari.

MAJOR GENERAL JAMES MCCONVILLE: This will be my second time going back to Afghanistan. You start to realize, I would have been much more effective if I understood the language and I understood the culture, and maybe some of the things that may offend them that may lead to some situations that are not in the best interest of either of our forces.

FARMER: A dozen U.S. troops were killed in August by forces dressed in Afghan uniform. The Pentagon believes the bloodshed is often a result of personal grievances and what it calls social difficulties. Language training is hardly a direct response to the killings, but McConville acknowledges it may help. Private 1st Class Maxwell Murphy says spending so much time with his Afghan instructors is at least a start.

PRIVATE 1ST CLASS MAXWELL MURPHY: I'm sure that a lot of my comrades don't believe that they can trust them. I mean, I don't totally believe that I can trust them all the time too.

FARMER: Once deployed, if a uniformed Afghan does go rogue, Murphy figures he'll be tipped off before anyone else. He says U.S. soldiers aren't expected to know the language.

MURPHY: You might pick up them saying things that they don't think that you'll know. So hopefully, maybe, we'll be able to catch some stuff before something happens.

FARMER: Whether an insider attack or outside threat, military commanders are hoping soldiers like Murphy find a way to occasionally use their words instead of their weapons. For NPR News, I'm Blake Farmer in Nashville. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.